Dashed hopes, dashed selves? A sociometer perspective on self-esteem change across the transition to secondary school

A. Poorthuis, S. Thomaes, M.A.G. van Aken, J.J.A. Denissen, B. Orobio de Castro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The transition from primary to secondary school challenges children's psychological well-being. A cross-transitional longitudinal study (N = 306; mean age = 12.2 years) examined why some children's self-esteem decreases across the transition whereas other children's self-esteem does not. Children's expected social acceptance in secondary school was measured before the transition; their actually perceived social acceptance was measured after the transition. Self-esteem and Big Five personality traits were measured both pre- and posttransition. Self-esteem changed as a function of the discrepancy between children's expected and actually perceived social acceptance. Furthermore, neuroticism magnified self-esteem decreases when children's ‘hopes were dashed'—when they experienced disappointing levels of social acceptance. These findings provide longitudinal support for sociometer theory across the critical transition to secondary school.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)770–783
JournalSocial Development
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Dashed hopes, dashed selves? A sociometer perspective on self-esteem change across the transition to secondary school'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Poorthuis, A., Thomaes, S., van Aken, M. A. G., Denissen, J. J. A., & Orobio de Castro, B. (2014). Dashed hopes, dashed selves? A sociometer perspective on self-esteem change across the transition to secondary school. Social Development, 23(4), 770–783. https://doi.org/10.1111/sode.12075