Decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions after cardioverter defibrillator implantation

I.A.L. Timmermans, N. Jongejan, M.M. Meine, P.A. Doevendans, A.E. Tuinenburg, H. Versteeg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background:

Driving restrictions for patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may require significant lifestyle adjustment and affect patients’ psychological well-being. This study explored the prevalence of, and factors associated with, patient-reported decrease in quality of life due to driving restrictions in the first 2 months postimplantation.

Methods:

Dutch ICD patients (N = 334; median age, 64 [interquartile range, 55Y70) years; 81% male) completed questionnaires at the time of implantation and 4 months postimplantation, assessing their sociodemographic, psychological, and driving-related characteristics. Clinical baseline data were retrieved from patients’ medical records.

Results:

Nearly half of the patients (49%) reported decreased quality of life due to
driving restrictions. Patient-reported reasons included dependency on others/public transport, (social) isolation, and inability to work. Patients reporting decreased quality of life were more likely to be younger (P = .01), to feel that the restriction lasts too long (P = .004), to have considered ICD refusal because of the restrictions (P = .03), and to have Type D personality (P = .02), anxiety (P = .05), depression (P = .003), and ICD-related concerns (P = .02).
Multivariable analysis showed that being younger than 60 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09Y4.88; P = .03), feeling the driving restriction lasts too long (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.23Y2.55; P = .002), and
depression (OR, 3.21; 95% CI, 1.09Y9.47; P = .035) were independently associated with decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions.

Conclusions:

This study indicated that a significant group of ICD patients may experience decreased quality of life because of the driving restrictions postimplantation. The restrictions seem to particularly affect patients who are younger and distressed and patients who feel that the restriction lasts too long.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)474-480
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Implantable Defibrillators
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Medical Records
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression

Cite this

Timmermans, I.A.L. ; Jongejan, N. ; Meine, M.M. ; Doevendans, P.A. ; Tuinenburg, A.E. ; Versteeg, H. / Decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions after cardioverter defibrillator implantation. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 474-480.
@article{103c25eb24ca4854909806b833deff83,
title = "Decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions after cardioverter defibrillator implantation",
abstract = "Background: Driving restrictions for patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may require significant lifestyle adjustment and affect patients’ psychological well-being. This study explored the prevalence of, and factors associated with, patient-reported decrease in quality of life due to driving restrictions in the first 2 months postimplantation. Methods: Dutch ICD patients (N = 334; median age, 64 [interquartile range, 55Y70) years; 81{\%} male) completed questionnaires at the time of implantation and 4 months postimplantation, assessing their sociodemographic, psychological, and driving-related characteristics. Clinical baseline data were retrieved from patients’ medical records.Results: Nearly half of the patients (49{\%}) reported decreased quality of life due todriving restrictions. Patient-reported reasons included dependency on others/public transport, (social) isolation, and inability to work. Patients reporting decreased quality of life were more likely to be younger (P = .01), to feel that the restriction lasts too long (P = .004), to have considered ICD refusal because of the restrictions (P = .03), and to have Type D personality (P = .02), anxiety (P = .05), depression (P = .003), and ICD-related concerns (P = .02).Multivariable analysis showed that being younger than 60 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.30; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.09Y4.88; P = .03), feeling the driving restriction lasts too long (OR, 1.77; 95{\%} CI, 1.23Y2.55; P = .002), anddepression (OR, 3.21; 95{\%} CI, 1.09Y9.47; P = .035) were independently associated with decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions. Conclusions: This study indicated that a significant group of ICD patients may experience decreased quality of life because of the driving restrictions postimplantation. The restrictions seem to particularly affect patients who are younger and distressed and patients who feel that the restriction lasts too long.",
author = "I.A.L. Timmermans and N. Jongejan and M.M. Meine and P.A. Doevendans and A.E. Tuinenburg and H. Versteeg",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1097/JCN.0000000000000474",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "474--480",
journal = "Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing",
issn = "0889-4655",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

Decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions after cardioverter defibrillator implantation. / Timmermans, I.A.L.; Jongejan, N.; Meine, M.M.; Doevendans, P.A.; Tuinenburg, A.E.; Versteeg, H.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 33, No. 5, 2018, p. 474-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions after cardioverter defibrillator implantation

AU - Timmermans, I.A.L.

AU - Jongejan, N.

AU - Meine, M.M.

AU - Doevendans, P.A.

AU - Tuinenburg, A.E.

AU - Versteeg, H.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Background: Driving restrictions for patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may require significant lifestyle adjustment and affect patients’ psychological well-being. This study explored the prevalence of, and factors associated with, patient-reported decrease in quality of life due to driving restrictions in the first 2 months postimplantation. Methods: Dutch ICD patients (N = 334; median age, 64 [interquartile range, 55Y70) years; 81% male) completed questionnaires at the time of implantation and 4 months postimplantation, assessing their sociodemographic, psychological, and driving-related characteristics. Clinical baseline data were retrieved from patients’ medical records.Results: Nearly half of the patients (49%) reported decreased quality of life due todriving restrictions. Patient-reported reasons included dependency on others/public transport, (social) isolation, and inability to work. Patients reporting decreased quality of life were more likely to be younger (P = .01), to feel that the restriction lasts too long (P = .004), to have considered ICD refusal because of the restrictions (P = .03), and to have Type D personality (P = .02), anxiety (P = .05), depression (P = .003), and ICD-related concerns (P = .02).Multivariable analysis showed that being younger than 60 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09Y4.88; P = .03), feeling the driving restriction lasts too long (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.23Y2.55; P = .002), anddepression (OR, 3.21; 95% CI, 1.09Y9.47; P = .035) were independently associated with decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions. Conclusions: This study indicated that a significant group of ICD patients may experience decreased quality of life because of the driving restrictions postimplantation. The restrictions seem to particularly affect patients who are younger and distressed and patients who feel that the restriction lasts too long.

AB - Background: Driving restrictions for patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may require significant lifestyle adjustment and affect patients’ psychological well-being. This study explored the prevalence of, and factors associated with, patient-reported decrease in quality of life due to driving restrictions in the first 2 months postimplantation. Methods: Dutch ICD patients (N = 334; median age, 64 [interquartile range, 55Y70) years; 81% male) completed questionnaires at the time of implantation and 4 months postimplantation, assessing their sociodemographic, psychological, and driving-related characteristics. Clinical baseline data were retrieved from patients’ medical records.Results: Nearly half of the patients (49%) reported decreased quality of life due todriving restrictions. Patient-reported reasons included dependency on others/public transport, (social) isolation, and inability to work. Patients reporting decreased quality of life were more likely to be younger (P = .01), to feel that the restriction lasts too long (P = .004), to have considered ICD refusal because of the restrictions (P = .03), and to have Type D personality (P = .02), anxiety (P = .05), depression (P = .003), and ICD-related concerns (P = .02).Multivariable analysis showed that being younger than 60 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09Y4.88; P = .03), feeling the driving restriction lasts too long (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.23Y2.55; P = .002), anddepression (OR, 3.21; 95% CI, 1.09Y9.47; P = .035) were independently associated with decreased quality of life due to driving restrictions. Conclusions: This study indicated that a significant group of ICD patients may experience decreased quality of life because of the driving restrictions postimplantation. The restrictions seem to particularly affect patients who are younger and distressed and patients who feel that the restriction lasts too long.

U2 - 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000474

DO - 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000474

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 474

EP - 480

JO - Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

JF - Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

SN - 0889-4655

IS - 5

ER -