Deficient multisensory integration in schizophrenia: An event-related potential study

J.J. Stekelenburg, J.P. Maes, A.R. van Gool, M.M. Sitskoorn, J. Vroomen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
In many natural audiovisual events (e.g., the sight of a face articulating the syllable /ba/), the visual signal precedes the sound and thus allows observers to predict the onset and the content of the sound. In healthy adults, the N1 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), reflecting neural activity associated with basic sound processing, is suppressed if a sound is accompanied by a video that reliably predicts sound onset. If the sound does not match the content of the video (e.g., hearing /ba/ while lipreading /fu/), the later occurring P2 component is affected. Here, we examined whether these visual information sources affect auditory processing in patients with schizophrenia.
Methods
The electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in 18 patients with schizophrenia and compared with that of 18 healthy volunteers. As stimuli we used video recordings of natural actions in which visual information preceded and predicted the onset of the sound that was either congruent or incongruent with the video.
Results
For the healthy control group, visual information reduced the auditory-evoked N1 if compared to a sound-only condition, and stimulus-congruency affected the P2. This reduction in N1 was absent in patients with schizophrenia, and the congruency effect on the P2 was diminished. Distributed source estimations revealed deficits in the network subserving audiovisual integration in patients with schizophrenia.
Conclusions
The results show a deficit in multisensory processing in patients with schizophrenia and suggest that multisensory integration dysfunction may be an important and, to date, under-researched aspect of schizophrenia.
Keywords: Schizophrenia, Event-related brain potentials, Auditory N1, P2, Multisensory perception, Audiovisual integration, Temporal prediction
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-261
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume147
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Lipreading
Video Recording
Hearing
Electroencephalography

Cite this

@article{0c7235a02cc048ce934d825346a9dbc7,
title = "Deficient multisensory integration in schizophrenia: An event-related potential study",
abstract = "BackgroundIn many natural audiovisual events (e.g., the sight of a face articulating the syllable /ba/), the visual signal precedes the sound and thus allows observers to predict the onset and the content of the sound. In healthy adults, the N1 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), reflecting neural activity associated with basic sound processing, is suppressed if a sound is accompanied by a video that reliably predicts sound onset. If the sound does not match the content of the video (e.g., hearing /ba/ while lipreading /fu/), the later occurring P2 component is affected. Here, we examined whether these visual information sources affect auditory processing in patients with schizophrenia.MethodsThe electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in 18 patients with schizophrenia and compared with that of 18 healthy volunteers. As stimuli we used video recordings of natural actions in which visual information preceded and predicted the onset of the sound that was either congruent or incongruent with the video.ResultsFor the healthy control group, visual information reduced the auditory-evoked N1 if compared to a sound-only condition, and stimulus-congruency affected the P2. This reduction in N1 was absent in patients with schizophrenia, and the congruency effect on the P2 was diminished. Distributed source estimations revealed deficits in the network subserving audiovisual integration in patients with schizophrenia.ConclusionsThe results show a deficit in multisensory processing in patients with schizophrenia and suggest that multisensory integration dysfunction may be an important and, to date, under-researched aspect of schizophrenia.Keywords: Schizophrenia, Event-related brain potentials, Auditory N1, P2, Multisensory perception, Audiovisual integration, Temporal prediction",
author = "J.J. Stekelenburg and J.P. Maes and {van Gool}, A.R. and M.M. Sitskoorn and J. Vroomen",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1016/j.schres.2013.04.038",
language = "English",
volume = "147",
pages = "253--261",
journal = "Schizophrenia Research",
issn = "0920-9964",
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number = "2-3",

}

Deficient multisensory integration in schizophrenia : An event-related potential study. / Stekelenburg, J.J.; Maes, J.P.; van Gool, A.R.; Sitskoorn, M.M.; Vroomen, J.

In: Schizophrenia Research, Vol. 147, No. 2-3, 2013, p. 253-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Deficient multisensory integration in schizophrenia

T2 - An event-related potential study

AU - Stekelenburg, J.J.

AU - Maes, J.P.

AU - van Gool, A.R.

AU - Sitskoorn, M.M.

AU - Vroomen, J.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - BackgroundIn many natural audiovisual events (e.g., the sight of a face articulating the syllable /ba/), the visual signal precedes the sound and thus allows observers to predict the onset and the content of the sound. In healthy adults, the N1 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), reflecting neural activity associated with basic sound processing, is suppressed if a sound is accompanied by a video that reliably predicts sound onset. If the sound does not match the content of the video (e.g., hearing /ba/ while lipreading /fu/), the later occurring P2 component is affected. Here, we examined whether these visual information sources affect auditory processing in patients with schizophrenia.MethodsThe electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in 18 patients with schizophrenia and compared with that of 18 healthy volunteers. As stimuli we used video recordings of natural actions in which visual information preceded and predicted the onset of the sound that was either congruent or incongruent with the video.ResultsFor the healthy control group, visual information reduced the auditory-evoked N1 if compared to a sound-only condition, and stimulus-congruency affected the P2. This reduction in N1 was absent in patients with schizophrenia, and the congruency effect on the P2 was diminished. Distributed source estimations revealed deficits in the network subserving audiovisual integration in patients with schizophrenia.ConclusionsThe results show a deficit in multisensory processing in patients with schizophrenia and suggest that multisensory integration dysfunction may be an important and, to date, under-researched aspect of schizophrenia.Keywords: Schizophrenia, Event-related brain potentials, Auditory N1, P2, Multisensory perception, Audiovisual integration, Temporal prediction

AB - BackgroundIn many natural audiovisual events (e.g., the sight of a face articulating the syllable /ba/), the visual signal precedes the sound and thus allows observers to predict the onset and the content of the sound. In healthy adults, the N1 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), reflecting neural activity associated with basic sound processing, is suppressed if a sound is accompanied by a video that reliably predicts sound onset. If the sound does not match the content of the video (e.g., hearing /ba/ while lipreading /fu/), the later occurring P2 component is affected. Here, we examined whether these visual information sources affect auditory processing in patients with schizophrenia.MethodsThe electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in 18 patients with schizophrenia and compared with that of 18 healthy volunteers. As stimuli we used video recordings of natural actions in which visual information preceded and predicted the onset of the sound that was either congruent or incongruent with the video.ResultsFor the healthy control group, visual information reduced the auditory-evoked N1 if compared to a sound-only condition, and stimulus-congruency affected the P2. This reduction in N1 was absent in patients with schizophrenia, and the congruency effect on the P2 was diminished. Distributed source estimations revealed deficits in the network subserving audiovisual integration in patients with schizophrenia.ConclusionsThe results show a deficit in multisensory processing in patients with schizophrenia and suggest that multisensory integration dysfunction may be an important and, to date, under-researched aspect of schizophrenia.Keywords: Schizophrenia, Event-related brain potentials, Auditory N1, P2, Multisensory perception, Audiovisual integration, Temporal prediction

U2 - 10.1016/j.schres.2013.04.038

DO - 10.1016/j.schres.2013.04.038

M3 - Article

VL - 147

SP - 253

EP - 261

JO - Schizophrenia Research

JF - Schizophrenia Research

SN - 0920-9964

IS - 2-3

ER -