Deprivatization of disbelief?

Non-religiosity and anti-religiosity in 14 Western European countries

Egbert Ribberink*, Peter Achterberg, Dick Houtman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This article aims to move beyond media discourse about "new atheism" by mapping and explaining anti-religious zeal among the public at large in 14 Western European countries. We analyze data from the International Social Survey Program, Religion III, 2008, to test two theories about how country-level religiousness affects anti-religiosity and its social bases: a theory of rationalization and a theory of deprivatization of disbelief. Hypotheses derived from the former are contradicted, whereas those derived from the latter are largely confirmed. Anti-religiosity is strongest among disbelievers and among the higher educated in the most religious countries and among the older generations in today's most secularized countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-120
Number of pages20
JournalPolitics and Religion
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • UNITED-STATES
  • NEW-AGE
  • NETHERLANDS
  • CHURCHES
  • ATHEISM
  • GENDER
  • DUTCH

Cite this

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abstract = "This article aims to move beyond media discourse about {"}new atheism{"} by mapping and explaining anti-religious zeal among the public at large in 14 Western European countries. We analyze data from the International Social Survey Program, Religion III, 2008, to test two theories about how country-level religiousness affects anti-religiosity and its social bases: a theory of rationalization and a theory of deprivatization of disbelief. Hypotheses derived from the former are contradicted, whereas those derived from the latter are largely confirmed. Anti-religiosity is strongest among disbelievers and among the higher educated in the most religious countries and among the older generations in today's most secularized countries.",
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Deprivatization of disbelief? Non-religiosity and anti-religiosity in 14 Western European countries. / Ribberink, Egbert; Achterberg, Peter; Houtman, Dick.

In: Politics and Religion, Vol. 6, No. 1, 03.2013, p. 101-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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