Determinants of excessive reassurance-seeking

Adolescents' internalized distress, friendship conflict, and inhibitory control as prospective predictors

Matthew G. Clayton, Matteo Giletta, Charlotte A. Boettiger, Mitchell J. Prinstein*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Substantial research suggests that excessive reassurance-seeking behavior is associated with exacerbations in depressive symptoms and later interpersonal rejection, yet remarkably few studies have examined predictors of this maladaptive social behavior. This study proposed and examined a diathesis stress model suggesting that beyond the effects of prior internalized distress, a combination of poor inhibitory control and dyadic friendship conflict may be especially relevant predictors of adolescents' excessive reassurance-seeking behavior. Longitudinal associations were examined in a sample of 865 adolescents (54.5% female, 22.2% African American, 23.1% Latinx) who completed self-reported measures of depressive rumination/intrusive thoughts, depressive symptoms, loneliness, friendship conflict, and a performance-based measure of inhibitory control at baseline, as well as a measure of excessive reassurance-seeking at baseline and 2 years later. Results initially revealed a prospective effect of depressive rumination/intrusive thoughts on later excessive reassurance-seeking, consistent with prior work. Final results yielded only a significant interaction effect, revealing that higher levels of friendship conflict coupled with low levels of inhibitory control were associated longitudinally with higher levels of excessive reassurance-seeking. Findings suggest that inhibitory control may moderate the association between adolescents' interpersonal conflict and their excessive reassurance-seeking.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019

Keywords

  • NEGATIVE FEEDBACK-SEEKING
  • DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
  • EXECUTIVE FUNCTION
  • GENDER-DIFFERENCES
  • PEER RELATIONS
  • STRESS
  • CHILDREN
  • QUESTIONNAIRE
  • ASSOCIATIONS
  • PERSPECTIVE

Cite this

@article{8769c6eb29a144c889bfe0772144b9b3,
title = "Determinants of excessive reassurance-seeking: Adolescents' internalized distress, friendship conflict, and inhibitory control as prospective predictors",
abstract = "Substantial research suggests that excessive reassurance-seeking behavior is associated with exacerbations in depressive symptoms and later interpersonal rejection, yet remarkably few studies have examined predictors of this maladaptive social behavior. This study proposed and examined a diathesis stress model suggesting that beyond the effects of prior internalized distress, a combination of poor inhibitory control and dyadic friendship conflict may be especially relevant predictors of adolescents' excessive reassurance-seeking behavior. Longitudinal associations were examined in a sample of 865 adolescents (54.5{\%} female, 22.2{\%} African American, 23.1{\%} Latinx) who completed self-reported measures of depressive rumination/intrusive thoughts, depressive symptoms, loneliness, friendship conflict, and a performance-based measure of inhibitory control at baseline, as well as a measure of excessive reassurance-seeking at baseline and 2 years later. Results initially revealed a prospective effect of depressive rumination/intrusive thoughts on later excessive reassurance-seeking, consistent with prior work. Final results yielded only a significant interaction effect, revealing that higher levels of friendship conflict coupled with low levels of inhibitory control were associated longitudinally with higher levels of excessive reassurance-seeking. Findings suggest that inhibitory control may moderate the association between adolescents' interpersonal conflict and their excessive reassurance-seeking.",
keywords = "NEGATIVE FEEDBACK-SEEKING, DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, EXECUTIVE FUNCTION, GENDER-DIFFERENCES, PEER RELATIONS, STRESS, CHILDREN, QUESTIONNAIRE, ASSOCIATIONS, PERSPECTIVE",
author = "Clayton, {Matthew G.} and Matteo Giletta and Boettiger, {Charlotte A.} and Prinstein, {Mitchell J.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/15374416.2019.1604234",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology",
issn = "1537-4416",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

Determinants of excessive reassurance-seeking : Adolescents' internalized distress, friendship conflict, and inhibitory control as prospective predictors. / Clayton, Matthew G.; Giletta, Matteo; Boettiger, Charlotte A.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

In: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Determinants of excessive reassurance-seeking

T2 - Adolescents' internalized distress, friendship conflict, and inhibitory control as prospective predictors

AU - Clayton, Matthew G.

AU - Giletta, Matteo

AU - Boettiger, Charlotte A.

AU - Prinstein, Mitchell J.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Substantial research suggests that excessive reassurance-seeking behavior is associated with exacerbations in depressive symptoms and later interpersonal rejection, yet remarkably few studies have examined predictors of this maladaptive social behavior. This study proposed and examined a diathesis stress model suggesting that beyond the effects of prior internalized distress, a combination of poor inhibitory control and dyadic friendship conflict may be especially relevant predictors of adolescents' excessive reassurance-seeking behavior. Longitudinal associations were examined in a sample of 865 adolescents (54.5% female, 22.2% African American, 23.1% Latinx) who completed self-reported measures of depressive rumination/intrusive thoughts, depressive symptoms, loneliness, friendship conflict, and a performance-based measure of inhibitory control at baseline, as well as a measure of excessive reassurance-seeking at baseline and 2 years later. Results initially revealed a prospective effect of depressive rumination/intrusive thoughts on later excessive reassurance-seeking, consistent with prior work. Final results yielded only a significant interaction effect, revealing that higher levels of friendship conflict coupled with low levels of inhibitory control were associated longitudinally with higher levels of excessive reassurance-seeking. Findings suggest that inhibitory control may moderate the association between adolescents' interpersonal conflict and their excessive reassurance-seeking.

AB - Substantial research suggests that excessive reassurance-seeking behavior is associated with exacerbations in depressive symptoms and later interpersonal rejection, yet remarkably few studies have examined predictors of this maladaptive social behavior. This study proposed and examined a diathesis stress model suggesting that beyond the effects of prior internalized distress, a combination of poor inhibitory control and dyadic friendship conflict may be especially relevant predictors of adolescents' excessive reassurance-seeking behavior. Longitudinal associations were examined in a sample of 865 adolescents (54.5% female, 22.2% African American, 23.1% Latinx) who completed self-reported measures of depressive rumination/intrusive thoughts, depressive symptoms, loneliness, friendship conflict, and a performance-based measure of inhibitory control at baseline, as well as a measure of excessive reassurance-seeking at baseline and 2 years later. Results initially revealed a prospective effect of depressive rumination/intrusive thoughts on later excessive reassurance-seeking, consistent with prior work. Final results yielded only a significant interaction effect, revealing that higher levels of friendship conflict coupled with low levels of inhibitory control were associated longitudinally with higher levels of excessive reassurance-seeking. Findings suggest that inhibitory control may moderate the association between adolescents' interpersonal conflict and their excessive reassurance-seeking.

KW - NEGATIVE FEEDBACK-SEEKING

KW - DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS

KW - EXECUTIVE FUNCTION

KW - GENDER-DIFFERENCES

KW - PEER RELATIONS

KW - STRESS

KW - CHILDREN

KW - QUESTIONNAIRE

KW - ASSOCIATIONS

KW - PERSPECTIVE

UR - https://app-eu.readspeaker.com/cgi-bin/rsent?customerid=10118&lang=en_us&readclass=rs_readArea&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tandfonline.com%2Fdoi%2Ffull%2F10.1080%2F15374416.2019.1604234

U2 - 10.1080/15374416.2019.1604234

DO - 10.1080/15374416.2019.1604234

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

JF - Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

SN - 1537-4416

ER -