Direct aggression and the balance between status and affection goals in adolescence

Jelle J. Sijtsema*, Siegwart M. Lindenberg, Tiina J. Ojanen, Christina Salmivalli

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientific

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Abstract

Previous studies have shown that status goals motivate direct forms of interpersonal aggression. However, status goals have been studied mostly in isolation from affection goals. It is theorized that the means by which status and affection goals are satisfied change during adolescence, which can affect aggression. This is tested in a pooled sample of (pre)adolescents (N = 1536; 49% girls; ages 10–15), by examining associations between status goals and direct aggression and the moderating role of affection goals. As hypothesized, with increasing age, status goals were more strongly associated with direct aggression. Moreover, for older adolescents, status goals were only associated with aggression when affection goals were weak. These findings support the changing relationship between status goals and direct aggression during adolescence.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019

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title = "Direct aggression and the balance between status and affection goals in adolescence",
abstract = "Previous studies have shown that status goals motivate direct forms of interpersonal aggression. However, status goals have been studied mostly in isolation from affection goals. It is theorized that the means by which status and affection goals are satisfied change during adolescence, which can affect aggression. This is tested in a pooled sample of (pre)adolescents (N = 1536; 49{\%} girls; ages 10–15), by examining associations between status goals and direct aggression and the moderating role of affection goals. As hypothesized, with increasing age, status goals were more strongly associated with direct aggression. Moreover, for older adolescents, status goals were only associated with aggression when affection goals were weak. These findings support the changing relationship between status goals and direct aggression during adolescence.",
author = "Sijtsema, {Jelle J.} and Lindenberg, {Siegwart M.} and Ojanen, {Tiina J.} and Christina Salmivalli",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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Direct aggression and the balance between status and affection goals in adolescence. / Sijtsema, Jelle J.; Lindenberg, Siegwart M.; Ojanen, Tiina J.; Salmivalli, Christina.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientific

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct aggression and the balance between status and affection goals in adolescence

AU - Sijtsema, Jelle J.

AU - Lindenberg, Siegwart M.

AU - Ojanen, Tiina J.

AU - Salmivalli, Christina

PY - 2019

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AB - Previous studies have shown that status goals motivate direct forms of interpersonal aggression. However, status goals have been studied mostly in isolation from affection goals. It is theorized that the means by which status and affection goals are satisfied change during adolescence, which can affect aggression. This is tested in a pooled sample of (pre)adolescents (N = 1536; 49% girls; ages 10–15), by examining associations between status goals and direct aggression and the moderating role of affection goals. As hypothesized, with increasing age, status goals were more strongly associated with direct aggression. Moreover, for older adolescents, status goals were only associated with aggression when affection goals were weak. These findings support the changing relationship between status goals and direct aggression during adolescence.

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