Disgust sensitivity selectively predicts attitudes toward groups that threaten (or uphold) traditional sexual morality

J. Crawford, Y. Inbar, V. Maloney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Previous research has linked disgust sensitivity to negative attitudes toward gays and lesbians. We extend this existing research by examining the extent to which disgust sensitivity predicts attitudes more generally toward groups that threaten or uphold traditional sexual morality. In a sample of American adults (N = 236), disgust sensitivity (and particularly contamination disgust) predicted negative attitudes toward groups that threaten traditional sexual morality (e.g., pro-choice activists), and positive attitudes toward groups that uphold traditional sexual morality (e.g., Evangelical Christians). Further, disgust sensitivity was a weaker predictor of attitudes toward left-aligned and right-aligned groups whose objectives are unrelated to traditional sexual morality (e.g., gun-control/gun-rights activists). Together, these findings are consistent with a sexual conservatism account for understanding the relationship between disgust sensitivity and intergroup attitudes.
Keywords: Disgust sensitivity, Prejudice, Intergroup attitudes, Sex
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-223
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume70
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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title = "Disgust sensitivity selectively predicts attitudes toward groups that threaten (or uphold) traditional sexual morality",
abstract = "Previous research has linked disgust sensitivity to negative attitudes toward gays and lesbians. We extend this existing research by examining the extent to which disgust sensitivity predicts attitudes more generally toward groups that threaten or uphold traditional sexual morality. In a sample of American adults (N = 236), disgust sensitivity (and particularly contamination disgust) predicted negative attitudes toward groups that threaten traditional sexual morality (e.g., pro-choice activists), and positive attitudes toward groups that uphold traditional sexual morality (e.g., Evangelical Christians). Further, disgust sensitivity was a weaker predictor of attitudes toward left-aligned and right-aligned groups whose objectives are unrelated to traditional sexual morality (e.g., gun-control/gun-rights activists). Together, these findings are consistent with a sexual conservatism account for understanding the relationship between disgust sensitivity and intergroup attitudes.Keywords: Disgust sensitivity, Prejudice, Intergroup attitudes, Sex",
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Disgust sensitivity selectively predicts attitudes toward groups that threaten (or uphold) traditional sexual morality. / Crawford, J.; Inbar, Y.; Maloney, V.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 70, 2014, p. 218-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AB - Previous research has linked disgust sensitivity to negative attitudes toward gays and lesbians. We extend this existing research by examining the extent to which disgust sensitivity predicts attitudes more generally toward groups that threaten or uphold traditional sexual morality. In a sample of American adults (N = 236), disgust sensitivity (and particularly contamination disgust) predicted negative attitudes toward groups that threaten traditional sexual morality (e.g., pro-choice activists), and positive attitudes toward groups that uphold traditional sexual morality (e.g., Evangelical Christians). Further, disgust sensitivity was a weaker predictor of attitudes toward left-aligned and right-aligned groups whose objectives are unrelated to traditional sexual morality (e.g., gun-control/gun-rights activists). Together, these findings are consistent with a sexual conservatism account for understanding the relationship between disgust sensitivity and intergroup attitudes.Keywords: Disgust sensitivity, Prejudice, Intergroup attitudes, Sex

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