Disorder-specific symptoms and psychosocial well-being in relation to no-show rates in forensic ADHD patients

Tessa Stoel, J.A.B.M. Houtepen, R. van der Lem, S. Bogaerts, J.J. Sijtsema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

No-show rates in forensic psychiatry are related to higher recidivism risk and financial costs in mental health care, yet little is known about risk factors for high no-show rates. In this study, the extent to which disorder specific symptoms and psychosocial well-being are related to no-show rates in forensic patients with ADHD was examined. Sixty male patients with ADHD (M age = 35.9, SD = 8.6) who received treatment in a Dutch forensic outpatient center completed the Adult Self-Report on disorder-specific symptoms and general psychosocial well-being. Data on no-show rates and background characteristics were obtained via electronic patient files. Independent sample t-tests showed a trend in which patients with high no-show rates (15–45% missed appointments) had more ADHD symptoms compared to patients with low no-show rates (0–14.9% missed appointments). Furthermore, multivariate regression analyses showed that rule-breaking, externalizing problems and somatic problems were associated with higher no-show rates, whereas anxiety problems were associated with lower no-show rates. Results suggest that no-show rates in forensic patients with ADHD are related to specific psychopathological symptoms. This knowledge can be used to prevent no-show in forensic psychiatric treatment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-71
JournalInternational Journal of Forensic Mental Health
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Keywords

  • ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
  • COMORBIDITY SURVEY REPLICATION
  • DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
  • GENERAL-PRACTICE
  • MENTAL-HEALTH-CENTER
  • MISSED APPOINTMENTS
  • NON-ATTENDANCE
  • No-show
  • PREVALENCE
  • PRISON-INMATES
  • PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITY
  • adult ADHD
  • disorder-specific symptoms
  • forensic psychiatry
  • psychosocial well-being

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