Do housing regimes matter? Assessing the concept of housing regimes through configurations of housing outcomes

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Abstract

Based on a conceptualisation of de-commodification as the right to decent and affordable housing, we assessed to what extent this right is realised for low-to-moderate-income owners and renters across Western European housing regimes in 1995 and 2012. If differences in the social production of housing do matter (regardless of type of welfare state and the country's economic affluence), then distinct configurations of housing outcomes should exist. This was found to be indeed the case: More state intervention results in good housing conditions and low housing cost burdens across tenure-age groups (but particularly for renters), although more so in social-democratic than in conservative-corporatist welfare states. A more important role for the family in housing provision is associated with higher subjective housing cost burdens and poor housing conditions. As housing regimes became more commodified between 1995 and 2012, it seems that configurations of housing outcomes have become less associated with the features of housing regimes, and more with type of welfare state and the country's economic affluence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)384-404
JournalInternational Journal of Social Welfare
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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