Do rules breed rules?

Vertical rule-making cascades at the supranational, national, and organizational level

W. Kaufmann, Arjen van Witteloostuijn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Understanding where (ineffective) organizational rules come from is of vital importance for both public administration scholars and practitioners. Yet, little is known about the underlying mechanisms that explain why external rules may cause organizational rule-breeding and, as a byproduct, red tape. Using a combination of archival and interview data, the authors empirically study rule-breeding processes in the case of Gasunie, which is a heavily regulated Dutch gas transport organization. The archival findings indicate that rule stocks have increased substantially over time at every policy level. Furthermore, the interview data supports the notion that policymakers at different levels are jointly responsible for excessive rule-breeding and, ultimately, organizational red tape.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)650-676
JournalInternational Public Management Journal
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

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interview
public administration
organization
cause
Organizational level
Cascade
Breeding
Red tape
time
Politicians
Gas
By-products
Public Administration

Cite this

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Do rules breed rules? Vertical rule-making cascades at the supranational, national, and organizational level. / Kaufmann, W.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen.

In: International Public Management Journal, Vol. 21, No. 4, 09.2018, p. 650-676.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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