Do social networks differ?

Comparison of the social networks of people with intellectual disabilities, people with autism spectrum disorders and other people living in the community

A.E. van Asselt-Goverts, P.J.C.M. Embregts, A.H.C. Hendriks, K. Wegman, J.P.W.M. Teunisse

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the similarities and differences in social network characteristics, satisfaction and wishes with respect to the social network between people with mild or borderline intellectual disabilities (ID), people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and a reference group. Data were gathered from 105 young adults living independently in the community. The social networks of people with ID and ASD are more restricted than those of the reference group. Compared with the other groups, people with ASD are less often satisfied with their networks. Each group has its own characteristics, issues and wishes with respect to their social network. Practical measures to enable professionals to adapt to these issues are discussed.
Keywords: Intellectual disabilities, Autism, Social network, Satisfaction Wishes
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1191-1203
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Disabled Persons
Young Adult
Autism Spectrum Disorder

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title = "Do social networks differ?: Comparison of the social networks of people with intellectual disabilities, people with autism spectrum disorders and other people living in the community",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to determine the similarities and differences in social network characteristics, satisfaction and wishes with respect to the social network between people with mild or borderline intellectual disabilities (ID), people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and a reference group. Data were gathered from 105 young adults living independently in the community. The social networks of people with ID and ASD are more restricted than those of the reference group. Compared with the other groups, people with ASD are less often satisfied with their networks. Each group has its own characteristics, issues and wishes with respect to their social network. Practical measures to enable professionals to adapt to these issues are discussed.Keywords: Intellectual disabilities, Autism, Social network, Satisfaction Wishes",
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Do social networks differ? Comparison of the social networks of people with intellectual disabilities, people with autism spectrum disorders and other people living in the community. / van Asselt-Goverts, A.E.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Wegman, K.; Teunisse, J.P.W.M.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 45, No. 5, 2015, p. 1191-1203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Do social networks differ?

T2 - Comparison of the social networks of people with intellectual disabilities, people with autism spectrum disorders and other people living in the community

AU - van Asselt-Goverts, A.E.

AU - Embregts, P.J.C.M.

AU - Hendriks, A.H.C.

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AU - Teunisse, J.P.W.M.

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AB - The aim of this study was to determine the similarities and differences in social network characteristics, satisfaction and wishes with respect to the social network between people with mild or borderline intellectual disabilities (ID), people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and a reference group. Data were gathered from 105 young adults living independently in the community. The social networks of people with ID and ASD are more restricted than those of the reference group. Compared with the other groups, people with ASD are less often satisfied with their networks. Each group has its own characteristics, issues and wishes with respect to their social network. Practical measures to enable professionals to adapt to these issues are discussed.Keywords: Intellectual disabilities, Autism, Social network, Satisfaction Wishes

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