Does distance from the equator predict self-control? Lessons from the Human Penguin Project

H. IJzerman, M.V. Coliç, M. Hennecke, Y. Hong, C.-P. Hu, Jennifer A. Joy-Gaba, D. Lazaqrevic, L. Lazarevic, M. Parzuchowski, K.G. Ratner, T. Schubert, A Schütz, D. Stojilovic, S.C. Weissgerber, J. Zickfeld, S.M. Lindenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We comment on the proposition “that lower temperatures and especially greater seasonal variation in temperature call for individuals and societies to adopt … a greater degree of self-control” (Van Lange et al., sect. 3, para. 4) for which we cannot find empirical support in a large data set with data-driven analyses. After providing greater nuance in our theoretical review, we suggest that Van Lange et al. revisit their model with an eye toward the social determinants of self-control.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e86
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume40
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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