Double dissociation between implicit and explicit affiliative motives: A closer look at socializing behavior in dyadic interactions

Birk Hagemeyer, Michael Dufner, J.J.A. Denissen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present research, we followed two objectives. First, we aimed to replicate the classic finding by McAdams, Jackson, and Kirshnit (1984) that strong implicit affiliative motives predict high levels of nonverbal socializing behavior (eye contact, laughing, smiling) in dyadic interactions with an unacquainted person. Second, we applied a dual-motives perspective and hypothesized a double dissociation between implicit and explicit motives. Whereas implicit motives were supposed to predict nonverbal socializing, the corresponding explicit motives were supposed to predict verbal socializing (i.e., self-disclosure). Using observational data from 123 university students in ostensibly casual conversations, the findings by McAdams et al. were replicated, and the double-dissociation hypothesis was confirmed. These results corroborate dual-motives theory in the domain of affiliative motivation.
Keywords: Social motivation, Intimacy, Affiliation, Implicit motives, Dyadic interaction, Nonverbal behavior, Picture Story Exercise
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-93
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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