E-cigarette and waterpipe use in two adolescent cohorts

Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with conventional cigarette smoking

J. L. Treur, A.D. Rozema, J.J.P. Mathijssen, J.A.M. van Oers, J. M. Vink

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Abstract

Alternative tobacco products are increasing in popularity. An important question is whether their use is associated with or even leads to conventional smoking, but large-scale (European) studies are scarce. In two cohorts of Dutch adolescents (Cohort I n = 6819, mean age = 13.8 SD = 1.1, 48.2% female; Cohort II n = 2758, mean age = 17.3 SD = 1.8, 61.3% female), we investigated use of electronic (e)-cigarettes with nicotine, e-cigarettes without nicotine and waterpipe. Generalized estimating equation modelling was conducted with ever conventional smoking as the dependent variable (0 = no, 1 = yes) and ever alternative tobacco use as the independent variable, correcting for clustering within schools, age, sex and education in both cohorts. In a subsample (n = 2100), the association between alternative tobacco use at baseline and conventional smoking 6 months later was tested, taking into account smoking propensity (based on personality, susceptibility to peer pressure and smoking intentions). Ever use prevalence was 13.7% for e-cigarettes with nicotine, 29.4% for e-cigarettes without nicotine and 22.1% for waterpipe in Cohort I and 12.3, 27.6 and 45.3% respectively in Cohort II. Ever smokers had tried alternative tobacco products more often than never smokers. Among never-smoking adolescents at baseline, alternative tobacco use predicted ever smoking 6 months later (e-cigarettes with nicotine OR 11.90 95% CI 3.36–42.11; e-cigarettes without nicotine OR 5.36 95% CI 2.73–10.52; waterpipe OR 5.36 95% CI 2.78–10.31). This association was strongest for adolescents with a low baseline risk of smoking. Experimenting with alternative tobacco products is common among Dutch youth. Alternative tobacco use predicts (future) smoking, especially among adolescents with a low smoking propensity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-334
JournalEuropean Journal of Epidemiology
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Nicotine
Cluster Analysis

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • E-cigarettes
  • Longitudinal
  • MARIJUANA USE
  • ONSET
  • Smoking
  • Smoking propensity
  • TOBACCO
  • Waterpipe
  • YOUTH

Cite this

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title = "E-cigarette and waterpipe use in two adolescent cohorts: Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with conventional cigarette smoking",
abstract = "Alternative tobacco products are increasing in popularity. An important question is whether their use is associated with or even leads to conventional smoking, but large-scale (European) studies are scarce. In two cohorts of Dutch adolescents (Cohort I n = 6819, mean age = 13.8 SD = 1.1, 48.2{\%} female; Cohort II n = 2758, mean age = 17.3 SD = 1.8, 61.3{\%} female), we investigated use of electronic (e)-cigarettes with nicotine, e-cigarettes without nicotine and waterpipe. Generalized estimating equation modelling was conducted with ever conventional smoking as the dependent variable (0 = no, 1 = yes) and ever alternative tobacco use as the independent variable, correcting for clustering within schools, age, sex and education in both cohorts. In a subsample (n = 2100), the association between alternative tobacco use at baseline and conventional smoking 6 months later was tested, taking into account smoking propensity (based on personality, susceptibility to peer pressure and smoking intentions). Ever use prevalence was 13.7{\%} for e-cigarettes with nicotine, 29.4{\%} for e-cigarettes without nicotine and 22.1{\%} for waterpipe in Cohort I and 12.3, 27.6 and 45.3{\%} respectively in Cohort II. Ever smokers had tried alternative tobacco products more often than never smokers. Among never-smoking adolescents at baseline, alternative tobacco use predicted ever smoking 6 months later (e-cigarettes with nicotine OR 11.90 95{\%} CI 3.36–42.11; e-cigarettes without nicotine OR 5.36 95{\%} CI 2.73–10.52; waterpipe OR 5.36 95{\%} CI 2.78–10.31). This association was strongest for adolescents with a low baseline risk of smoking. Experimenting with alternative tobacco products is common among Dutch youth. Alternative tobacco use predicts (future) smoking, especially among adolescents with a low smoking propensity.",
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E-cigarette and waterpipe use in two adolescent cohorts : Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with conventional cigarette smoking. / Treur, J. L.; Rozema, A.D.; Mathijssen, J.J.P.; van Oers, J.A.M.; Vink, J. M.

In: European Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 33, No. 3, 2018, p. 323-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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T2 - Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with conventional cigarette smoking

AU - Treur, J. L.

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AB - Alternative tobacco products are increasing in popularity. An important question is whether their use is associated with or even leads to conventional smoking, but large-scale (European) studies are scarce. In two cohorts of Dutch adolescents (Cohort I n = 6819, mean age = 13.8 SD = 1.1, 48.2% female; Cohort II n = 2758, mean age = 17.3 SD = 1.8, 61.3% female), we investigated use of electronic (e)-cigarettes with nicotine, e-cigarettes without nicotine and waterpipe. Generalized estimating equation modelling was conducted with ever conventional smoking as the dependent variable (0 = no, 1 = yes) and ever alternative tobacco use as the independent variable, correcting for clustering within schools, age, sex and education in both cohorts. In a subsample (n = 2100), the association between alternative tobacco use at baseline and conventional smoking 6 months later was tested, taking into account smoking propensity (based on personality, susceptibility to peer pressure and smoking intentions). Ever use prevalence was 13.7% for e-cigarettes with nicotine, 29.4% for e-cigarettes without nicotine and 22.1% for waterpipe in Cohort I and 12.3, 27.6 and 45.3% respectively in Cohort II. Ever smokers had tried alternative tobacco products more often than never smokers. Among never-smoking adolescents at baseline, alternative tobacco use predicted ever smoking 6 months later (e-cigarettes with nicotine OR 11.90 95% CI 3.36–42.11; e-cigarettes without nicotine OR 5.36 95% CI 2.73–10.52; waterpipe OR 5.36 95% CI 2.78–10.31). This association was strongest for adolescents with a low baseline risk of smoking. Experimenting with alternative tobacco products is common among Dutch youth. Alternative tobacco use predicts (future) smoking, especially among adolescents with a low smoking propensity.

KW - Adolescents

KW - E-cigarettes

KW - Longitudinal

KW - MARIJUANA USE

KW - ONSET

KW - Smoking

KW - Smoking propensity

KW - TOBACCO

KW - Waterpipe

KW - YOUTH

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JF - European Journal of Epidemiology

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