Educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption

The role of psychosocial and material stressors

M Droomers*, CTM Schrijvers, K Stronks, D van de Mheen, JP Mackenbach

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background. 

Socioeconomic differences in health are determined mainly by socioeconomic differences in unhealthy behavior. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that account for socioeconomic differences in unhealthy behavior, such as excessive alcohol consumption. In this paper we examined educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption in The Netherlands and whether these may be explained by educational differences in experienced stress and stress-moderating factors.

Methods. 

Data were obtained from the baseline survey of the Longitudinal Study on Socio Economic Health Differences in 1991. Excessive drinking was defined as drinking more than six glasses on 3 or more days a week or more than four glasses on 5 or more days a week. Socioeconomic status was indicated by educational level. Stressors were divided into psychosocial and material factors. Analyses were performed for women (n = 756) and men (n = 1,006) separately, among drinkers only.

Results. 

Excessive alcohol consumption was more common among lower educational groups. Material stressors, such as financial problems, deprivation, and income, were related to part of the educational gradient in excessive alcohol consumption. Differences in stress-moderating factors were not related to the educational gradient in excessive drinking.

Conclusions. 

Our results suggest that improvement of material conditions among the lower educational groups could result in a reduction of socioeconomic differences in excessive alcohol consumption. (C) 1999 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • alcohol drinking
  • socioeconomic factors
  • educational status
  • stress
  • coping
  • adult
  • SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITIES
  • PROBLEM DRINKING
  • HEAVY DRINKING
  • SOCIAL SUPPORT
  • HEALTH
  • POPULATION
  • BEHAVIOR
  • NETHERLANDS
  • SAMPLE
  • WOMEN

Cite this

Droomers, M ; Schrijvers, CTM ; Stronks, K ; van de Mheen, D ; Mackenbach, JP. / Educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption : The role of psychosocial and material stressors. In: Preventive Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 1-10.
@article{2d8d99a7eca04aa891e0e9d9b9d4041a,
title = "Educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption: The role of psychosocial and material stressors",
abstract = "Background. Socioeconomic differences in health are determined mainly by socioeconomic differences in unhealthy behavior. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that account for socioeconomic differences in unhealthy behavior, such as excessive alcohol consumption. In this paper we examined educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption in The Netherlands and whether these may be explained by educational differences in experienced stress and stress-moderating factors.Methods. Data were obtained from the baseline survey of the Longitudinal Study on Socio Economic Health Differences in 1991. Excessive drinking was defined as drinking more than six glasses on 3 or more days a week or more than four glasses on 5 or more days a week. Socioeconomic status was indicated by educational level. Stressors were divided into psychosocial and material factors. Analyses were performed for women (n = 756) and men (n = 1,006) separately, among drinkers only.Results. Excessive alcohol consumption was more common among lower educational groups. Material stressors, such as financial problems, deprivation, and income, were related to part of the educational gradient in excessive alcohol consumption. Differences in stress-moderating factors were not related to the educational gradient in excessive drinking.Conclusions. Our results suggest that improvement of material conditions among the lower educational groups could result in a reduction of socioeconomic differences in excessive alcohol consumption. (C) 1999 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.",
keywords = "alcohol drinking, socioeconomic factors, educational status, stress, coping, adult, SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITIES, PROBLEM DRINKING, HEAVY DRINKING, SOCIAL SUPPORT, HEALTH, POPULATION, BEHAVIOR, NETHERLANDS, SAMPLE, WOMEN",
author = "M Droomers and CTM Schrijvers and K Stronks and {van de Mheen}, D and JP Mackenbach",
year = "1999",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1006/pmed.1999.0496",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE",
number = "1",

}

Educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption : The role of psychosocial and material stressors. / Droomers, M; Schrijvers, CTM; Stronks, K; van de Mheen, D; Mackenbach, JP.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 1, 07.1999, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption

T2 - The role of psychosocial and material stressors

AU - Droomers, M

AU - Schrijvers, CTM

AU - Stronks, K

AU - van de Mheen, D

AU - Mackenbach, JP

PY - 1999/7

Y1 - 1999/7

N2 - Background. Socioeconomic differences in health are determined mainly by socioeconomic differences in unhealthy behavior. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that account for socioeconomic differences in unhealthy behavior, such as excessive alcohol consumption. In this paper we examined educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption in The Netherlands and whether these may be explained by educational differences in experienced stress and stress-moderating factors.Methods. Data were obtained from the baseline survey of the Longitudinal Study on Socio Economic Health Differences in 1991. Excessive drinking was defined as drinking more than six glasses on 3 or more days a week or more than four glasses on 5 or more days a week. Socioeconomic status was indicated by educational level. Stressors were divided into psychosocial and material factors. Analyses were performed for women (n = 756) and men (n = 1,006) separately, among drinkers only.Results. Excessive alcohol consumption was more common among lower educational groups. Material stressors, such as financial problems, deprivation, and income, were related to part of the educational gradient in excessive alcohol consumption. Differences in stress-moderating factors were not related to the educational gradient in excessive drinking.Conclusions. Our results suggest that improvement of material conditions among the lower educational groups could result in a reduction of socioeconomic differences in excessive alcohol consumption. (C) 1999 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

AB - Background. Socioeconomic differences in health are determined mainly by socioeconomic differences in unhealthy behavior. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that account for socioeconomic differences in unhealthy behavior, such as excessive alcohol consumption. In this paper we examined educational differences in excessive alcohol consumption in The Netherlands and whether these may be explained by educational differences in experienced stress and stress-moderating factors.Methods. Data were obtained from the baseline survey of the Longitudinal Study on Socio Economic Health Differences in 1991. Excessive drinking was defined as drinking more than six glasses on 3 or more days a week or more than four glasses on 5 or more days a week. Socioeconomic status was indicated by educational level. Stressors were divided into psychosocial and material factors. Analyses were performed for women (n = 756) and men (n = 1,006) separately, among drinkers only.Results. Excessive alcohol consumption was more common among lower educational groups. Material stressors, such as financial problems, deprivation, and income, were related to part of the educational gradient in excessive alcohol consumption. Differences in stress-moderating factors were not related to the educational gradient in excessive drinking.Conclusions. Our results suggest that improvement of material conditions among the lower educational groups could result in a reduction of socioeconomic differences in excessive alcohol consumption. (C) 1999 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

KW - alcohol drinking

KW - socioeconomic factors

KW - educational status

KW - stress

KW - coping

KW - adult

KW - SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITIES

KW - PROBLEM DRINKING

KW - HEAVY DRINKING

KW - SOCIAL SUPPORT

KW - HEALTH

KW - POPULATION

KW - BEHAVIOR

KW - NETHERLANDS

KW - SAMPLE

KW - WOMEN

U2 - 10.1006/pmed.1999.0496

DO - 10.1006/pmed.1999.0496

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

IS - 1

ER -