Elephants or onions? Paying for nature in Amboseli, Kenya

E.H. Bulte, R. Boone, R. Stringer, P. Thornton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Traditional grazing grounds near Amboseli National Park (Kenya) are being rapidly converted to cropland – a process that closes important wildlife corridors. We use a spatially explicit simulation model that integrates ecosystem dynamics and pastoral decision-making to explore the scope for introducing a ‘payments for ecosystem services’ scheme to compensate pastoralists for spillover benefits associated with forms of land use that are compatible with wildlife conservation. Our break-even cost analysis suggests that the benefits of such a scheme likely exceed its costs for a large part of the study area, but that ‘leakage effects’ through excessive stocking rates warrant close scrutiny.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-414
JournalEnvironment and Development Economics
Volume13
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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cost analysis
ecosystem dynamics
elephant
nature conservation
ecosystem service
Kenya
leakage
national park
grazing
decision making
land use
costs
simulation model
cost
simulation
conservation
rate
effect
stocking
wildlife

Cite this

Bulte, E. H., Boone, R., Stringer, R., & Thornton, P. (2008). Elephants or onions? Paying for nature in Amboseli, Kenya. Environment and Development Economics, 13(3), 395-414.
Bulte, E.H. ; Boone, R. ; Stringer, R. ; Thornton, P. / Elephants or onions? Paying for nature in Amboseli, Kenya. In: Environment and Development Economics. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 395-414.
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Bulte, EH, Boone, R, Stringer, R & Thornton, P 2008, 'Elephants or onions? Paying for nature in Amboseli, Kenya', Environment and Development Economics, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 395-414.

Elephants or onions? Paying for nature in Amboseli, Kenya. / Bulte, E.H.; Boone, R.; Stringer, R.; Thornton, P.

In: Environment and Development Economics, Vol. 13, No. 3, 2008, p. 395-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Bulte EH, Boone R, Stringer R, Thornton P. Elephants or onions? Paying for nature in Amboseli, Kenya. Environment and Development Economics. 2008;13(3):395-414.