Emotional experience and prosocial behavior in observers of unjust situations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Five studies tested the emotional experience and prosocial motivations in observers (i.e., third parties) of unjust situations. Studies 1 and 2 found that anger was the most dominant emotion experienced in unjust situations, and that prosocial behavior towards a victim decreased when justice had already been restored by compensation of the victim. Study 3 added that the experience of anger also decreases when justice is restored. Study 4 generalized the effects to different types of compensation. Study 5 switches to the perspective of the victim, showing a larger decrease in the most dominant emotion anger
when justice was restored by means of compensation than by punishment. The implications of these findings with regard to third-party emotions and behavior in unjust situations are discussed.
Keywords: injustice, emotion, prosocial, compensation, punishment, third party
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-59
JournalApplied Psychology in Criminal Justice
Volume15
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

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title = "Emotional experience and prosocial behavior in observers of unjust situations",
abstract = "Five studies tested the emotional experience and prosocial motivations in observers (i.e., third parties) of unjust situations. Studies 1 and 2 found that anger was the most dominant emotion experienced in unjust situations, and that prosocial behavior towards a victim decreased when justice had already been restored by compensation of the victim. Study 3 added that the experience of anger also decreases when justice is restored. Study 4 generalized the effects to different types of compensation. Study 5 switches to the perspective of the victim, showing a larger decrease in the most dominant emotion angerwhen justice was restored by means of compensation than by punishment. The implications of these findings with regard to third-party emotions and behavior in unjust situations are discussed. Keywords: injustice, emotion, prosocial, compensation, punishment, third party",
author = "{Van Doorn}, J. and M. Zeelenberg and S.M. Breugelmans",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "41--59",
journal = "Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice",
number = "1",

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Emotional experience and prosocial behavior in observers of unjust situations. / Van Doorn, J.; Zeelenberg, M.; Breugelmans, S.M.

In: Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2019, p. 41-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Breugelmans, S.M.

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AB - Five studies tested the emotional experience and prosocial motivations in observers (i.e., third parties) of unjust situations. Studies 1 and 2 found that anger was the most dominant emotion experienced in unjust situations, and that prosocial behavior towards a victim decreased when justice had already been restored by compensation of the victim. Study 3 added that the experience of anger also decreases when justice is restored. Study 4 generalized the effects to different types of compensation. Study 5 switches to the perspective of the victim, showing a larger decrease in the most dominant emotion angerwhen justice was restored by means of compensation than by punishment. The implications of these findings with regard to third-party emotions and behavior in unjust situations are discussed. Keywords: injustice, emotion, prosocial, compensation, punishment, third party

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JO - Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice

JF - Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice

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