Employment status and subjective well-being

The role of the social norm to work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This article examines to what extent a social norm to work moderates the relationship between employment status and subjective well-being. It was expected that the detrimental impact of non-employment on subjective well-being would be larger in countries with a stronger social norm. Using a direct measure of the social norm to work and employing data from 45 European countries, this study assessed subjective well-being levels of five employment status groups for men and women separately. Results showed that subjective well-being of unemployed men and women is unaffected by the social norm to work. However, non-working disabled men are worse off in countries with a stronger norm. Living in such a country also decreases the well-being gap between employed and retired men, whereas retired women are worse off in these countries. This effect for retirees disappears when a country’s GDP is taken into account, suggesting that norms matter less than affluence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-333
JournalWork, Employment and Society
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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social norm
well-being
employment relationship
retiree
affluence
status group
Social norms
Employment status
Subjective well-being

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title = "Employment status and subjective well-being: The role of the social norm to work",
abstract = "This article examines to what extent a social norm to work moderates the relationship between employment status and subjective well-being. It was expected that the detrimental impact of non-employment on subjective well-being would be larger in countries with a stronger social norm. Using a direct measure of the social norm to work and employing data from 45 European countries, this study assessed subjective well-being levels of five employment status groups for men and women separately. Results showed that subjective well-being of unemployed men and women is unaffected by the social norm to work. However, non-working disabled men are worse off in countries with a stronger norm. Living in such a country also decreases the well-being gap between employed and retired men, whereas retired women are worse off in these countries. This effect for retirees disappears when a country’s GDP is taken into account, suggesting that norms matter less than affluence.",
author = "K. Stam and I.J.P. Sieben and C.M.C. Verbakel and {de Graaf}, P.M.",
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Employment status and subjective well-being : The role of the social norm to work . / Stam, K.; Sieben, I.J.P.; Verbakel, C.M.C.; de Graaf, P.M.

In: Work, Employment and Society, Vol. 30, No. 2, 2016, p. 309-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T2 - The role of the social norm to work

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AU - Verbakel, C.M.C.

AU - de Graaf, P.M.

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AB - This article examines to what extent a social norm to work moderates the relationship between employment status and subjective well-being. It was expected that the detrimental impact of non-employment on subjective well-being would be larger in countries with a stronger social norm. Using a direct measure of the social norm to work and employing data from 45 European countries, this study assessed subjective well-being levels of five employment status groups for men and women separately. Results showed that subjective well-being of unemployed men and women is unaffected by the social norm to work. However, non-working disabled men are worse off in countries with a stronger norm. Living in such a country also decreases the well-being gap between employed and retired men, whereas retired women are worse off in these countries. This effect for retirees disappears when a country’s GDP is taken into account, suggesting that norms matter less than affluence.

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