Engineering interaction

Structural change, locus of identification, and the formation and maintenance of cross-unit ties

Steven Gray*, J.S Bunderson, Peter Boumgarden, John P Bechara

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Cross‐unit ties – relationships that facilitate discretionary information sharing between individuals from different business units – offer a range of organizational benefits. Scholars argue that organizations can promote cross‐unit ties by: a) formally bringing together individuals from different business units into structural links (e.g., cross‐unit strategic committees) to encourage the formation of new cross unit ties and, b) transferring individuals across units, which can increase cross‐unit interaction when ties to the prior unit are maintained. This study considers the notion that the success of these formal interventions in fostering cross‐unit interaction is contingent on identification with the local unit relative to identification with the broader organization. Specifically, we propose that structural links are more likely to foster cross‐unit ties when organizational identification is high and unit identification is low. In contrast, lateral …
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages24
JournalPersonnel Psychology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

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Structural change
Interaction
Information sharing
Organizational identification

Cite this

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title = "Engineering interaction: Structural change, locus of identification, and the formation and maintenance of cross-unit ties",
abstract = "Cross‐unit ties – relationships that facilitate discretionary information sharing between individuals from different business units – offer a range of organizational benefits. Scholars argue that organizations can promote cross‐unit ties by: a) formally bringing together individuals from different business units into structural links (e.g., cross‐unit strategic committees) to encourage the formation of new cross unit ties and, b) transferring individuals across units, which can increase cross‐unit interaction when ties to the prior unit are maintained. This study considers the notion that the success of these formal interventions in fostering cross‐unit interaction is contingent on identification with the local unit relative to identification with the broader organization. Specifically, we propose that structural links are more likely to foster cross‐unit ties when organizational identification is high and unit identification is low. In contrast, lateral …",
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Engineering interaction : Structural change, locus of identification, and the formation and maintenance of cross-unit ties. / Gray, Steven; Bunderson, J.S; Boumgarden, Peter; Bechara, John P.

In: Personnel Psychology, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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