Ethnic differences in associations among popularity, likability, and trajectories of adolescents' alcohol use and frequency

S. Choukas-Bradley, M. Giletta, E.W. Neblett , M.J. Prinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two-part latent growth models examined associations between two forms of peer status (popularity, likability) and adolescents' alcohol use trajectories throughout high school; ethnicity was examined as a moderator. Ninth-grade low-income adolescents (N = 364; Mage = 15.08; 52.5% Caucasian; 25.8% African American; 21.7% Latino) completed sociometric nominations of peer status and aggression at baseline, and reported their alcohol use every 6 months. After controlling for gender, aggression, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, popularity—but not likability—prospectively predicted alcohol use trajectories. However, these effects were moderated by ethnicity, suggesting popularity as a risk factor for alcohol use probability and frequency among Caucasian and Latino, but not African American adolescents. Results suggest that developmental correlates of peer status should be considered within cultural context.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)519–535
JournalChild Development
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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