Evaluating staff training: Taking account of interactions between staff and clients with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
Hastings (2010) has recently emphasised 3 aspects in the training of staff who serve clients with mild to moderate intellectual disability and challenging behaviour (CB): Staff attitudes, self-awareness, and clients' perspectives. This study investigates whether programs include these aspects.
Method
A systematic search yielded 11 relevant articles.
Results
Generally, all programs aimed to improve staff knowledge and skills. Client variables concerned frequencies and severities of CB. None of the studies included clients' perspectives or staff attitudes and self-awareness.
Conclusions
The fact that staff attitudes and awareness or clients' perspectives were not among the main goals of the training studies suggests that recent views of effective treatment of CB are not yet the object of scientific study. Given the acknowledgment of these aspects, it is warranted that future research focuses upon these recent insights.
Keywords: training, intellectual disability, challenging behaviour, attitudes, self-awareness
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-364
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Volume38
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

disability
self awareness
staff
interaction
Intellectual Disability
Staff
Interaction
Self-awareness

Cite this

@article{a6c795d5e9a449c5a59af93231bb7a03,
title = "Evaluating staff training: Taking account of interactions between staff and clients with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour",
abstract = "Background Hastings (2010) has recently emphasised 3 aspects in the training of staff who serve clients with mild to moderate intellectual disability and challenging behaviour (CB): Staff attitudes, self-awareness, and clients' perspectives. This study investigates whether programs include these aspects.Method A systematic search yielded 11 relevant articles.Results Generally, all programs aimed to improve staff knowledge and skills. Client variables concerned frequencies and severities of CB. None of the studies included clients' perspectives or staff attitudes and self-awareness.Conclusions The fact that staff attitudes and awareness or clients' perspectives were not among the main goals of the training studies suggests that recent views of effective treatment of CB are not yet the object of scientific study. Given the acknowledgment of these aspects, it is warranted that future research focuses upon these recent insights.Keywords: training, intellectual disability, challenging behaviour, attitudes, self-awareness",
author = "{van Oorsouw}, W.M.W.J. and P.J.C.M. Embregts and A.M.T. Bosman",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "356--364",
journal = "Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability",
issn = "1366-8250",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluating staff training

T2 - Taking account of interactions between staff and clients with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour

AU - van Oorsouw, W.M.W.J.

AU - Embregts, P.J.C.M.

AU - Bosman, A.M.T.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background Hastings (2010) has recently emphasised 3 aspects in the training of staff who serve clients with mild to moderate intellectual disability and challenging behaviour (CB): Staff attitudes, self-awareness, and clients' perspectives. This study investigates whether programs include these aspects.Method A systematic search yielded 11 relevant articles.Results Generally, all programs aimed to improve staff knowledge and skills. Client variables concerned frequencies and severities of CB. None of the studies included clients' perspectives or staff attitudes and self-awareness.Conclusions The fact that staff attitudes and awareness or clients' perspectives were not among the main goals of the training studies suggests that recent views of effective treatment of CB are not yet the object of scientific study. Given the acknowledgment of these aspects, it is warranted that future research focuses upon these recent insights.Keywords: training, intellectual disability, challenging behaviour, attitudes, self-awareness

AB - Background Hastings (2010) has recently emphasised 3 aspects in the training of staff who serve clients with mild to moderate intellectual disability and challenging behaviour (CB): Staff attitudes, self-awareness, and clients' perspectives. This study investigates whether programs include these aspects.Method A systematic search yielded 11 relevant articles.Results Generally, all programs aimed to improve staff knowledge and skills. Client variables concerned frequencies and severities of CB. None of the studies included clients' perspectives or staff attitudes and self-awareness.Conclusions The fact that staff attitudes and awareness or clients' perspectives were not among the main goals of the training studies suggests that recent views of effective treatment of CB are not yet the object of scientific study. Given the acknowledgment of these aspects, it is warranted that future research focuses upon these recent insights.Keywords: training, intellectual disability, challenging behaviour, attitudes, self-awareness

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 356

EP - 364

JO - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

JF - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

SN - 1366-8250

IS - 4

ER -