Examining the trade‐off between confidence and optimism in future forecasts

O. Stavrova*, A.M. Evans

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Confident business forecasters are seen as more credible and competent (“confidence heuristic”). We explored a boundary condition of this effect by examining how individuals react to the trade‐off between confidence and optimism. Using hypothetical scenarios, we examined this trade‐off from the perspectives of judges (i.e., business owners who hired analysts to make sales predictions) and forecasters (i.e., the analysts hired to make predictions). Participants were assigned to the role of either judges or forecasters and were asked to rate 2 potential forecasts. In the “no trade‐off” condition, the 2 forecasts were aligned in optimism and confidence (the more confident forecast was also more optimistic); in the “trade‐off” condition, the more confident forecast was less optimistic. In Experiment 1, judges were more likely to positively evaluate confident forecasters when confident forecasters were the more (vs. less) optimistic ones. Experiment 2 demonstrated that forecasters were aware of judges' preferences for optimism and strategically relied on methods that resulted in more optimistic (but less reliable) predictions. Experiment 3 directly compared the perspectives of judges and forecasters, revealing that forecasters overestimated judges' preferences for optimism over confidence. The present studies show that forecasters and judges have different views of the trade‐off between confidence and optimism and that forecasters may unnecessarily sacrifice accuracy for optimism.
KEYWORDS: advice giving, confidence heuristic, forecasts, optimism, warmth, morality, and competence
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-14
JournalJournal of Behavioral Decision Making
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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optimism
confidence
heuristics
experiment
Optimism
Trade-offs
Confidence
morality
Mental Competency
sales
scenario
Prediction
Experiment

Keywords

  • ADVICE
  • BIAS
  • DECISION-MAKING
  • IMPACT
  • MORALITY
  • NEGATIVE FEEDBACK
  • ORGANIZATIONAL SILENCE
  • SELF
  • TRANSMISSION
  • UNREALISTIC OPTIMISM
  • advice giving
  • confidence heuristic
  • forecasts
  • optimism
  • warmth, morality, and competence

Cite this

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abstract = "Confident business forecasters are seen as more credible and competent (“confidence heuristic”). We explored a boundary condition of this effect by examining how individuals react to the trade‐off between confidence and optimism. Using hypothetical scenarios, we examined this trade‐off from the perspectives of judges (i.e., business owners who hired analysts to make sales predictions) and forecasters (i.e., the analysts hired to make predictions). Participants were assigned to the role of either judges or forecasters and were asked to rate 2 potential forecasts. In the “no trade‐off” condition, the 2 forecasts were aligned in optimism and confidence (the more confident forecast was also more optimistic); in the “trade‐off” condition, the more confident forecast was less optimistic. In Experiment 1, judges were more likely to positively evaluate confident forecasters when confident forecasters were the more (vs. less) optimistic ones. Experiment 2 demonstrated that forecasters were aware of judges' preferences for optimism and strategically relied on methods that resulted in more optimistic (but less reliable) predictions. Experiment 3 directly compared the perspectives of judges and forecasters, revealing that forecasters overestimated judges' preferences for optimism over confidence. The present studies show that forecasters and judges have different views of the trade‐off between confidence and optimism and that forecasters may unnecessarily sacrifice accuracy for optimism. KEYWORDS: advice giving, confidence heuristic, forecasts, optimism, warmth, morality, and competence",
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Examining the trade‐off between confidence and optimism in future forecasts. / Stavrova, O.; Evans, A.M.

In: Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, Vol. 32, No. 1, 2019, p. 3-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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