Experiences of service users with a mild intellectual disability or borderline intellectual functioning with Flexible Assertive Community Treatment: A qualitative study

L. J. Neijmeijer*, C. Kuiper, H. Kroon, R. Didden

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
In the Netherlands, Flexible Assertive Community Treatment (FACT) teams have been established for people with mild intellectual disability (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) and mental health problems or challenging behaviour. Little is known yet about service users’ experiences with FACT.

Method
An inductive grounded theory approach was used to explore how service users valued the treatment and their own functioning, and which factors were perceived as supportive. Semi‐structured interviews were held with 15 service users.

Results
Most service users highly appreciated the contact with the staff and the practical and emotional support. Persistent involvement, availability and humanity, and respect for autonomy were distinguished as core values in the relationship with the staff. Most service users experienced improvement in time and attributed this to intrapersonal changes and/or less stress in life.

Conclusions
From the perspective of service users with MID/BIF, FACT appears to have an added value.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1005-1015
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

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