Explaining educational differences in mortality: The role of behavioral and material factors

CTM Schrijvers*, K Stronks, HD van de Mheen, JP Mackenbach

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. 

This study examined the role of behavioral and material factors in explaining educational differences in all-cause mortality, taking into account the overlap between both types of factors.

Methods. 

Prospective data were used on 15 451 participants in a Dutch longitudinal study. Relative hazards of all-cause mortality by educational level were calculated before and after adjustment for behavioral factors (alcohol intake, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, dietary habits) and material factors (financial problems, neighborhood conditions, housing conditions, crowding, employment status, a proxy of income).

Results. 

Mortality was higher in lower educational groups. Four behavioral factors (alcohol, smoking, body mass index, physical activity) and 3 material factors (financial problems, employment status, income proxy) explained part of the educational differences in mortality. With the overlap between both types of factors accounted for, material factors were more important than behavioral factors in explaining mortality differences by educational level.

Conclusions. 

The association between educational level and mortality can be largely explained by material factors. Thus, improving the material situation of people might substantially reduce educational differences in mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-540
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume89
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFERENTIALS
  • HEALTH
  • INEQUALITIES
  • MEN
  • NETHERLANDS
  • EXPLANATION
  • LONGEVITY
  • DISEASE
  • LEVEL

Cite this

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title = "Explaining educational differences in mortality: The role of behavioral and material factors",
abstract = "Objectives. This study examined the role of behavioral and material factors in explaining educational differences in all-cause mortality, taking into account the overlap between both types of factors.Methods. Prospective data were used on 15 451 participants in a Dutch longitudinal study. Relative hazards of all-cause mortality by educational level were calculated before and after adjustment for behavioral factors (alcohol intake, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, dietary habits) and material factors (financial problems, neighborhood conditions, housing conditions, crowding, employment status, a proxy of income).Results. Mortality was higher in lower educational groups. Four behavioral factors (alcohol, smoking, body mass index, physical activity) and 3 material factors (financial problems, employment status, income proxy) explained part of the educational differences in mortality. With the overlap between both types of factors accounted for, material factors were more important than behavioral factors in explaining mortality differences by educational level.Conclusions. The association between educational level and mortality can be largely explained by material factors. Thus, improving the material situation of people might substantially reduce educational differences in mortality.",
keywords = "PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFERENTIALS, HEALTH, INEQUALITIES, MEN, NETHERLANDS, EXPLANATION, LONGEVITY, DISEASE, LEVEL",
author = "CTM Schrijvers and K Stronks and {van de Mheen}, HD and JP Mackenbach",
year = "1999",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.89.4.535",
language = "English",
volume = "89",
pages = "535--540",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
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}

Explaining educational differences in mortality : The role of behavioral and material factors. / Schrijvers, CTM; Stronks, K; van de Mheen, HD; Mackenbach, JP.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 89, No. 4, 1999, p. 535-540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Explaining educational differences in mortality

T2 - The role of behavioral and material factors

AU - Schrijvers, CTM

AU - Stronks, K

AU - van de Mheen, HD

AU - Mackenbach, JP

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Objectives. This study examined the role of behavioral and material factors in explaining educational differences in all-cause mortality, taking into account the overlap between both types of factors.Methods. Prospective data were used on 15 451 participants in a Dutch longitudinal study. Relative hazards of all-cause mortality by educational level were calculated before and after adjustment for behavioral factors (alcohol intake, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, dietary habits) and material factors (financial problems, neighborhood conditions, housing conditions, crowding, employment status, a proxy of income).Results. Mortality was higher in lower educational groups. Four behavioral factors (alcohol, smoking, body mass index, physical activity) and 3 material factors (financial problems, employment status, income proxy) explained part of the educational differences in mortality. With the overlap between both types of factors accounted for, material factors were more important than behavioral factors in explaining mortality differences by educational level.Conclusions. The association between educational level and mortality can be largely explained by material factors. Thus, improving the material situation of people might substantially reduce educational differences in mortality.

AB - Objectives. This study examined the role of behavioral and material factors in explaining educational differences in all-cause mortality, taking into account the overlap between both types of factors.Methods. Prospective data were used on 15 451 participants in a Dutch longitudinal study. Relative hazards of all-cause mortality by educational level were calculated before and after adjustment for behavioral factors (alcohol intake, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, dietary habits) and material factors (financial problems, neighborhood conditions, housing conditions, crowding, employment status, a proxy of income).Results. Mortality was higher in lower educational groups. Four behavioral factors (alcohol, smoking, body mass index, physical activity) and 3 material factors (financial problems, employment status, income proxy) explained part of the educational differences in mortality. With the overlap between both types of factors accounted for, material factors were more important than behavioral factors in explaining mortality differences by educational level.Conclusions. The association between educational level and mortality can be largely explained by material factors. Thus, improving the material situation of people might substantially reduce educational differences in mortality.

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KW - INEQUALITIES

KW - MEN

KW - NETHERLANDS

KW - EXPLANATION

KW - LONGEVITY

KW - DISEASE

KW - LEVEL

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