Explaining emotional exhaustion and work engagement: The role of job demands-resources and Type D personality

M. van den Tooren, C.G. Rutte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to show that Type D personality—a personality trait characterized by high levels of negative affectivity and high levels of social inhibition—can explain a significant amount of variance in emotional exhaustion and work engagement above and beyond the variance explained by job demands and job resources. An Internet survey was conducted in a large, representative sample of the Dutch working population. In line with our hypotheses, results showed that when controlling for the effects of job demands and job resources, employees with a Type D personality experience more emotional exhaustion and less work engagement than employees without a Type D personality. The main effects of job demands and job resources were in line with our hypotheses, except for the relation between job demands and work engagement; job demands appeared to enhance work engagement. This study contributes to knowledge in several ways. First, this study shows the importance of Type D personality in the development of emotional exhaustion and work engagement next to job demands and job resources. Second, our results add to a growing body of evidence showing that job demands, job resources, and personality should be incorporated in 1 model in order to predict emotional exhaustion and work engagement in an optimal way.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-166
JournalInternational Journal of Stress Management
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Explaining emotional exhaustion and work engagement: The role of job demands-resources and Type D personality'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this