Explaining frailty by lifestyle

R.J.J. Gobbens, M.A.L.M. van Assen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: 

To determine whether the effects of lifestyle factors on frailty can be adequately addressed by asking a single self-report question.

Design: 

Cross-sectional study.

Setting: 

A sample of Dutch citizens completed the web-based questionnaire "Seniorenbarometer".

Participants: 

610 persons aged 50 years and older.

Measurements: 

Seven lifestyle factors were assessed: smoking, use of alcohol, intake of vegetables, intake of fruit, having breakfast, exercise, and teeth brushing. The single self-report question of lifestyle was: "Overall, how healthy would you say your lifestyle is?" Frailty was measured by the Tilburg Frailty Indicator.

Results: 

Age was positively associated with a healthy lifestyle (less smoking, more intake of vegetables, fruit and eating breakfast). The lifestyle factors did not improve the prediction of total, physical, psychological, and social frailty, after controlling for the single self-report question.

Conclusion: 

Our study suggests that one general self-report lifestyle question, rather than a list of specific lifestyle factors, suffices for predicting frailty. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-53
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume66
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Frailty
  • Lifestyle
  • Tilburg frailty indicator
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
  • DISABILITY
  • PEOPLE
  • MORTALITY
  • HEALTH
  • WOMEN

Cite this

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title = "Explaining frailty by lifestyle",
abstract = "Objective: To determine whether the effects of lifestyle factors on frailty can be adequately addressed by asking a single self-report question.Design: Cross-sectional study.Setting: A sample of Dutch citizens completed the web-based questionnaire {"}Seniorenbarometer{"}.Participants: 610 persons aged 50 years and older.Measurements: Seven lifestyle factors were assessed: smoking, use of alcohol, intake of vegetables, intake of fruit, having breakfast, exercise, and teeth brushing. The single self-report question of lifestyle was: {"}Overall, how healthy would you say your lifestyle is?{"} Frailty was measured by the Tilburg Frailty Indicator.Results: Age was positively associated with a healthy lifestyle (less smoking, more intake of vegetables, fruit and eating breakfast). The lifestyle factors did not improve the prediction of total, physical, psychological, and social frailty, after controlling for the single self-report question.Conclusion: Our study suggests that one general self-report lifestyle question, rather than a list of specific lifestyle factors, suffices for predicting frailty. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Frailty, Lifestyle, Tilburg frailty indicator, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, OLDER-ADULTS, PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES, DISABILITY, PEOPLE, MORTALITY, HEALTH, WOMEN",
author = "R.J.J. Gobbens and {van Assen}, M.A.L.M.",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1016/j.archger.2016.04.011",
language = "English",
volume = "66",
pages = "49--53",
journal = "Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics",
issn = "0167-4943",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

Explaining frailty by lifestyle. / Gobbens, R.J.J.; van Assen, M.A.L.M.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 66, 2016, p. 49-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Explaining frailty by lifestyle

AU - Gobbens, R.J.J.

AU - van Assen, M.A.L.M.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Objective: To determine whether the effects of lifestyle factors on frailty can be adequately addressed by asking a single self-report question.Design: Cross-sectional study.Setting: A sample of Dutch citizens completed the web-based questionnaire "Seniorenbarometer".Participants: 610 persons aged 50 years and older.Measurements: Seven lifestyle factors were assessed: smoking, use of alcohol, intake of vegetables, intake of fruit, having breakfast, exercise, and teeth brushing. The single self-report question of lifestyle was: "Overall, how healthy would you say your lifestyle is?" Frailty was measured by the Tilburg Frailty Indicator.Results: Age was positively associated with a healthy lifestyle (less smoking, more intake of vegetables, fruit and eating breakfast). The lifestyle factors did not improve the prediction of total, physical, psychological, and social frailty, after controlling for the single self-report question.Conclusion: Our study suggests that one general self-report lifestyle question, rather than a list of specific lifestyle factors, suffices for predicting frailty. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Objective: To determine whether the effects of lifestyle factors on frailty can be adequately addressed by asking a single self-report question.Design: Cross-sectional study.Setting: A sample of Dutch citizens completed the web-based questionnaire "Seniorenbarometer".Participants: 610 persons aged 50 years and older.Measurements: Seven lifestyle factors were assessed: smoking, use of alcohol, intake of vegetables, intake of fruit, having breakfast, exercise, and teeth brushing. The single self-report question of lifestyle was: "Overall, how healthy would you say your lifestyle is?" Frailty was measured by the Tilburg Frailty Indicator.Results: Age was positively associated with a healthy lifestyle (less smoking, more intake of vegetables, fruit and eating breakfast). The lifestyle factors did not improve the prediction of total, physical, psychological, and social frailty, after controlling for the single self-report question.Conclusion: Our study suggests that one general self-report lifestyle question, rather than a list of specific lifestyle factors, suffices for predicting frailty. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Frailty

KW - Lifestyle

KW - Tilburg frailty indicator

KW - QUALITY-OF-LIFE

KW - OLDER-ADULTS

KW - PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES

KW - DISABILITY

KW - PEOPLE

KW - MORTALITY

KW - HEALTH

KW - WOMEN

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ER -