Exploring facilitators and barriers to using a person centered care intervention in a nursing home setting

Noortje Kloos*, Constance H. C. Drossaert, Hester R. Trompetter, Ernst T. Bohlmeijer, Gerben J. Westerhof

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Person-centered care (PCC) interventions have the potential to improve resident well-being in nursing homes, but can be difficult to implement. This study investigates perceived facilitators and barriers reported by nursing staff to using a PCC intervention consisting of three components: assessment of resident well-being, planning of well-being support, and behavioral changes in care to support resident well-being. Our explorative mixed method study combined interviews (n = 11) with a longitudinal survey (n = 132) to examine which determinants were most prevalent and predictive for intention to use the intervention and actual implementation 3 months later (n = 63). Results showed that perceived barriers and facilitators were dependent on the components of the intervention. Assessment of resident well-being required a stable nursing home context and a detailed implementation plan, while planning of well-being support was impeded by knowledge. Behavioral changes in nursing care required easy integration in daily caring tasks and social support. (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)730-739
JournalGeriatric Nursing
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Nursing staff
  • Well-being
  • Person centered care
  • Implementation
  • Extended care facility
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • DEMENTIA-CARE
  • PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTIONS
  • IMPLEMENTATION
  • PEOPLE
  • DETERMINANTS
  • RESIDENT
  • OUTCOMES
  • CADRES

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