Exploring the relationships between high involvement work system practices, work demands and emotional exhaustion

A multi-level study

V. Oppenauer, F.C. van de Voorde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This study explores the impact of enacted high involvement work systems (HIWS) practices on employee emotional exhaustion. This study hypothesized that work overload and job responsibility mediate the relationship between HIWS practices (ability, motivation, opportunity and work design HIWS practices) and employee emotional exhaustion. A total of 360 employees (nested within 49 work units) rated their feelings of work overload, job responsibility and emotional exhaustion. The line managers from these work units rated the enacted HIWS practices. Results indicate that ability- and motivation HIWS practices are positively related to work overload, and ability-, motivation- and work design HIWS practices are positively related to job responsibility. In turn, job responsibility reduces emotional exhaustion, whereas work overload has a positive effect on emotional exhaustion. The findings of this study underline the importance of blending the occupational health psychology literature with macro insights of the strategic human resource management (SHRM) literature to develop a more refined multi-level model of the processes by which HIWS affects employee emotional exhaustion.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311-337
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Personnel
Human resource management
Macros
Managers
Health
Systems practice
Work demands
Emotional exhaustion
Overload
Employees
Responsibility
Work design

Keywords

  • BLACK-BOX
  • EMPIRICAL-EXAMINATION
  • Emotional exhaustion
  • HIWS
  • JOB DEMANDS
  • MEDIATING MECHANISMS
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • METAANALYTIC TEST
  • NEW-ZEALAND
  • ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE
  • RESOURCE MANAGEMENT-PRACTICES
  • VOLUNTARY TURNOVER
  • job hindrances-challenges
  • job responsibility
  • macro- and micro-perspective
  • multi-level analysis
  • work overload

Cite this

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abstract = "This study explores the impact of enacted high involvement work systems (HIWS) practices on employee emotional exhaustion. This study hypothesized that work overload and job responsibility mediate the relationship between HIWS practices (ability, motivation, opportunity and work design HIWS practices) and employee emotional exhaustion. A total of 360 employees (nested within 49 work units) rated their feelings of work overload, job responsibility and emotional exhaustion. The line managers from these work units rated the enacted HIWS practices. Results indicate that ability- and motivation HIWS practices are positively related to work overload, and ability-, motivation- and work design HIWS practices are positively related to job responsibility. In turn, job responsibility reduces emotional exhaustion, whereas work overload has a positive effect on emotional exhaustion. The findings of this study underline the importance of blending the occupational health psychology literature with macro insights of the strategic human resource management (SHRM) literature to develop a more refined multi-level model of the processes by which HIWS affects employee emotional exhaustion.",
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Exploring the relationships between high involvement work system practices, work demands and emotional exhaustion : A multi-level study. / Oppenauer, V.; van de Voorde, F.C.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 29, No. 2, 2018, p. 311-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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