Exposure to poverty and productivity

Patricio Dalton, Victor Gonzalez Jimenez, Charles Noussair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

602 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We study whether exposure to poverty can induce affective states that decrease productivity. In a controlled laboratory setting, we find that subjects randomly assigned to a treatment, in which they view a video featuring individuals that live in extreme poverty, exhibit lower subsequent productivity compared to subjects assigned to a control treatment. Questionnaire responses, as well as facial recognition software, provide quantitative measures of the affective state evoked by the two treatments. Subjects exposed to images of poverty experience a more negative affective state than those in the control treatment. Further analysis shows that individuals in a more positive emotional state exhibit less of a treatment effect. Also, those who exhibit greater attentiveness upon viewing the poverty video are less productive. The results are consistent with the notion that exposure to poverty can induce a psychological state in individuals that adversely affects productivity.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0170231
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Productivity

Cite this

Dalton, P., Gonzalez Jimenez, V., & Noussair, C. (2017). Exposure to poverty and productivity. PLoS ONE, 12(1), [e0170231]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0170231
Dalton, Patricio ; Gonzalez Jimenez, Victor ; Noussair, Charles. / Exposure to poverty and productivity. In: PLoS ONE. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 1.
@article{f8000f4ab5d54ca5bf732c1d90589f9b,
title = "Exposure to poverty and productivity",
abstract = "We study whether exposure to poverty can induce affective states that decrease productivity. In a controlled laboratory setting, we find that subjects randomly assigned to a treatment, in which they view a video featuring individuals that live in extreme poverty, exhibit lower subsequent productivity compared to subjects assigned to a control treatment. Questionnaire responses, as well as facial recognition software, provide quantitative measures of the affective state evoked by the two treatments. Subjects exposed to images of poverty experience a more negative affective state than those in the control treatment. Further analysis shows that individuals in a more positive emotional state exhibit less of a treatment effect. Also, those who exhibit greater attentiveness upon viewing the poverty video are less productive. The results are consistent with the notion that exposure to poverty can induce a psychological state in individuals that adversely affects productivity.",
author = "Patricio Dalton and {Gonzalez Jimenez}, Victor and Charles Noussair",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0170231",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "PLoS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE",
number = "1",

}

Dalton, P, Gonzalez Jimenez, V & Noussair, C 2017, 'Exposure to poverty and productivity', PLoS ONE, vol. 12, no. 1, e0170231. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0170231

Exposure to poverty and productivity. / Dalton, Patricio; Gonzalez Jimenez, Victor; Noussair, Charles.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 12, No. 1, e0170231, 01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exposure to poverty and productivity

AU - Dalton, Patricio

AU - Gonzalez Jimenez, Victor

AU - Noussair, Charles

PY - 2017/1

Y1 - 2017/1

N2 - We study whether exposure to poverty can induce affective states that decrease productivity. In a controlled laboratory setting, we find that subjects randomly assigned to a treatment, in which they view a video featuring individuals that live in extreme poverty, exhibit lower subsequent productivity compared to subjects assigned to a control treatment. Questionnaire responses, as well as facial recognition software, provide quantitative measures of the affective state evoked by the two treatments. Subjects exposed to images of poverty experience a more negative affective state than those in the control treatment. Further analysis shows that individuals in a more positive emotional state exhibit less of a treatment effect. Also, those who exhibit greater attentiveness upon viewing the poverty video are less productive. The results are consistent with the notion that exposure to poverty can induce a psychological state in individuals that adversely affects productivity.

AB - We study whether exposure to poverty can induce affective states that decrease productivity. In a controlled laboratory setting, we find that subjects randomly assigned to a treatment, in which they view a video featuring individuals that live in extreme poverty, exhibit lower subsequent productivity compared to subjects assigned to a control treatment. Questionnaire responses, as well as facial recognition software, provide quantitative measures of the affective state evoked by the two treatments. Subjects exposed to images of poverty experience a more negative affective state than those in the control treatment. Further analysis shows that individuals in a more positive emotional state exhibit less of a treatment effect. Also, those who exhibit greater attentiveness upon viewing the poverty video are less productive. The results are consistent with the notion that exposure to poverty can induce a psychological state in individuals that adversely affects productivity.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0170231

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0170231

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - PLoS ONE

JF - PLoS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 1

M1 - e0170231

ER -

Dalton P, Gonzalez Jimenez V, Noussair C. Exposure to poverty and productivity. PLoS ONE. 2017 Jan;12(1). e0170231. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0170231