First principles in the life sciences: the free-energy principle, organicism, and mechanism

Matteo Colombo*, Cory Wright

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    62 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The free-energy principle states that all systems that minimize their free energy resist a tendency to physical disintegration. Originally proposed to account for perception, learning, and action, the free-energy principle has been applied to the evolution, development, morphology, anatomy and function of the brain, and has been called a postulate, an unfalsifiable principle, a natural law, and an imperative. While it might afford a theoretical foundation for understanding the relationship between environment, life, and mind, its epistemic status is unclear. Also unclear is how the free-energy principle relates to prominent theoretical approaches to life science phenomena, such as organicism and mechanism. This paper clarifies both issues, and identifies limits and prospects for the free-energy principle as a first principle in the life sciences.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3463-3488
    Number of pages26
    JournalSynthese
    Volume198
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021

    Keywords

    • Adaptation
    • Free energy
    • Life
    • Mechanism
    • Organicism

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