For whom does mindfulness-based stress reduction work?: An examination of moderating effects of personality

I. Nyklicek, M. Irrmischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to examine potentially moderating effects of personality characteristics regarding changes in anxious and depressed mood associated with Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), controlling forsociodemographicactors.Meditation-naïvearticipants from the general population self-presenting with psychological stress complaints (n= 167 participants, 70% women, mean age 45.8 ± 9.3 years) were assessed in a longitudinal investigation of change in mood before and after the intervention and at a 3-month follow-up. Participants initially scoring high on neurot-icism showed stronger decreases in bothanxious and depressed mood (bothp< 0.001). However, when controlled for baseline mood,only the time by neuroticism interaction effect on anxiety remained significant(p=0.001),reflecting a smaller decrease inanxiety between pre-and post-intervention but a larger decrease in anxiety between post-intervention and follow-up in those with higher baseline neuroticism scores. Most personality factors did not show moderating effects, when controlled for base-line mood. Only neuroticism showed to be associated with delayed benefit. Results are discussed in the context of findingsfrom similar research using more traditional cognitive behavioral interventions.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1106-1116
JournalMindfulness
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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mood
personality
neuroticism
examination
anxiety
psychological stress
Meditation
meditation
personality traits
complaint
interaction
Neuroticism

Cite this

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title = "For whom does mindfulness-based stress reduction work?: An examination of moderating effects of personality",
abstract = "The aim of the present study was to examine potentially moderating effects of personality characteristics regarding changes in anxious and depressed mood associated with Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), controlling forsociodemographicactors.Meditation-na{\"i}vearticipants from the general population self-presenting with psychological stress complaints (n= 167 participants, 70{\%} women, mean age 45.8 ± 9.3 years) were assessed in a longitudinal investigation of change in mood before and after the intervention and at a 3-month follow-up. Participants initially scoring high on neurot-icism showed stronger decreases in bothanxious and depressed mood (bothp< 0.001). However, when controlled for baseline mood,only the time by neuroticism interaction effect on anxiety remained significant(p=0.001),reflecting a smaller decrease inanxiety between pre-and post-intervention but a larger decrease in anxiety between post-intervention and follow-up in those with higher baseline neuroticism scores. Most personality factors did not show moderating effects, when controlled for base-line mood. Only neuroticism showed to be associated with delayed benefit. Results are discussed in the context of findingsfrom similar research using more traditional cognitive behavioral interventions.",
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For whom does mindfulness-based stress reduction work? An examination of moderating effects of personality. / Nyklicek, I.; Irrmischer, M.

In: Mindfulness, Vol. 8, No. 4, 2017, p. 1106-1116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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