Future-oriented emotions

Conceptualization and behavioral effects

H. Baumgartner, R. Pieters, R.P. Bagozzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We distinguish between two kinds of future‐oriented emotions (anticipatory and anticipated) and investigate their behavioral effects. Anticipatory emotions are currently experienced due to the prospect of a future event (e.g., hope or fear). Anticipated emotions, on the other hand, are expected to be experienced in the future if certain events do or do not occur (e.g., anticipated joy or regret). We discuss the theoretical differences between the two types of future‐oriented emotions and examine their role in motivating goal‐directed behavior. The results of a longitudinal study (n = 472) and a separate control group analysis (n = 340) provide consistent support for the convergent and discriminant validity of positive/negative anticipatory and anticipated emotions and their independent influence on goal‐directed behavior.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)685-696
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume38
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Cite this

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Future-oriented emotions : Conceptualization and behavioral effects. / Baumgartner, H.; Pieters, R.; Bagozzi, R.P.

In: European Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 38, No. 4, 2008, p. 685-696.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Future-oriented emotions

T2 - Conceptualization and behavioral effects

AU - Baumgartner, H.

AU - Pieters, R.

AU - Bagozzi, R.P.

PY - 2008

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N2 - We distinguish between two kinds of future‐oriented emotions (anticipatory and anticipated) and investigate their behavioral effects. Anticipatory emotions are currently experienced due to the prospect of a future event (e.g., hope or fear). Anticipated emotions, on the other hand, are expected to be experienced in the future if certain events do or do not occur (e.g., anticipated joy or regret). We discuss the theoretical differences between the two types of future‐oriented emotions and examine their role in motivating goal‐directed behavior. The results of a longitudinal study (n = 472) and a separate control group analysis (n = 340) provide consistent support for the convergent and discriminant validity of positive/negative anticipatory and anticipated emotions and their independent influence on goal‐directed behavior.

AB - We distinguish between two kinds of future‐oriented emotions (anticipatory and anticipated) and investigate their behavioral effects. Anticipatory emotions are currently experienced due to the prospect of a future event (e.g., hope or fear). Anticipated emotions, on the other hand, are expected to be experienced in the future if certain events do or do not occur (e.g., anticipated joy or regret). We discuss the theoretical differences between the two types of future‐oriented emotions and examine their role in motivating goal‐directed behavior. The results of a longitudinal study (n = 472) and a separate control group analysis (n = 340) provide consistent support for the convergent and discriminant validity of positive/negative anticipatory and anticipated emotions and their independent influence on goal‐directed behavior.

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 685

EP - 696

JO - European Journal of Social Psychology

JF - European Journal of Social Psychology

SN - 0046-2772

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ER -