Gender and the effect of working hours on firm-sponsored training

Matteo Picchio, Jan van Ours

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Using employees’ longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, part-time working women are as likely to receive training as full-time working women. Although we cannot rule out gender-working time specific monopsony power, we speculate that the gender-specific effect of working hours on training has to do with gender-specific stereotyping. In the Netherlands, for women it is common to work part-time. More than half of the prime age female employees work part-time. Therefore, because of social norms, men working part-time could send a different signal to their employer than women working part-time. This might generate a different propensity of firms to sponsor training of male part-timers than female part-timers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-211
JournalJournal of Economic Behavior & Organization
Volume125
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2016

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Working hours
Employees
Sponsor
Working time
Propensity
Social norms
Longitudinal data
Employers
Workers
Stereotyping
Monopsony
The Netherlands

Keywords

  • part-time employment
  • working hours
  • firm-sponsored training
  • gender
  • human capital

Cite this

Picchio, Matteo ; van Ours, Jan. / Gender and the effect of working hours on firm-sponsored training. In: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization. 2016 ; Vol. 125. pp. 192-211.
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Gender and the effect of working hours on firm-sponsored training. / Picchio, Matteo; van Ours, Jan.

In: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Vol. 125, 05.2016, p. 192-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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