Gender stereotype-inconsistent acts are seen as more acceptable than stereotype-consistent acts, if they are clever

M.H.J. Meijs, J. Lammers, Kate A. Ratliff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Four studies show that gender stereotype-inconsistent behavior is seen as more acceptable than gender stereotype-consistent behavior, if it is clever. Four studies found consistently that participants rated the behavior of a man who relied on attractiveness or passiveness (stereotypically female) to be more acceptable than similar behavior by a woman. The behavior of a woman who relied on dominance or aggressiveness (stereotypically male) was sometimes seen as more (Study 1A) and sometimes equally (Study 1B, Study 2, Study 3) acceptable as the behavior of a man who acted similarly. This shows that double standards might play a role: Whereas men are benefited by gender stereotype-inconsistent behavior, this is not the case for women. Across studies, these effects were driven by the interpretation of the gender stereotype-inconsistent acts as more clever and less trashy than gender stereotype-consistent acts. These results qualify the idea that people dislike stereotype-inconsistency.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-305
JournalSocial Psychology
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • gender roles
  • stereotyping
  • inconsistency
  • COUNTER-STEREOTYPES
  • CREATIVE COGNITION
  • STATUS INCONGRUITY
  • BENEVOLENT SEXISM
  • DOUBLE STANDARDS
  • AGENTIC WOMEN
  • SHOULD-NOT
  • BACKLASH
  • POWER
  • MEN

Cite this

Meijs, M.H.J. ; Lammers, J. ; Ratliff, Kate A. / Gender stereotype-inconsistent acts are seen as more acceptable than stereotype-consistent acts, if they are clever. In: Social Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 46, No. 5. pp. 291-305.
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Gender stereotype-inconsistent acts are seen as more acceptable than stereotype-consistent acts, if they are clever. / Meijs, M.H.J.; Lammers, J.; Ratliff, Kate A.

In: Social Psychology, Vol. 46, No. 5, 2015, p. 291-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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