High-performance work systems and creativity implementation: the role of psychological capital and psychological safety

Promila Agarwal, E. Farndale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Unimplemented creative ideas are potentially wasted opportunities for organisations. Although it is largely understood how to encourage creativity among employees, how to ensure this creativity is implemented remains underexplored. The objective of the current study is to identify the underlying mechanisms that explain the relationship between high-performance work systems and creativity implementation. Drawing from the job demands-resources model, we explore a model of psychological capital and psychological safety as mediators in the relationship between high-performance work systems and creativity implementation. Based on 505 employee survey responses, the findings show support for the mediating relationships, highlighting the importance of psychological mechanisms. The study has important implications for HRM, uncovering how people management practices can encourage creativity implementation in the workplace.

LanguageEnglish
Pages440-458
JournalHuman Resource Management Journal
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2017

Keywords

  • high-performance work systems
  • psychological capital
  • psychological safety
  • creativity implementation
  • HUMAN-RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
  • EMPLOYEE CREATIVITY
  • MEDIATING ROLE
  • FIRM PERFORMANCE
  • INTRINSIC MOTIVATION
  • MEASUREMENT ERROR
  • INNOVATION
  • INVOLVEMENT
  • IMPACT
  • ORGANIZATIONS

Cite this

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abstract = "Unimplemented creative ideas are potentially wasted opportunities for organisations. Although it is largely understood how to encourage creativity among employees, how to ensure this creativity is implemented remains underexplored. The objective of the current study is to identify the underlying mechanisms that explain the relationship between high-performance work systems and creativity implementation. Drawing from the job demands-resources model, we explore a model of psychological capital and psychological safety as mediators in the relationship between high-performance work systems and creativity implementation. Based on 505 employee survey responses, the findings show support for the mediating relationships, highlighting the importance of psychological mechanisms. The study has important implications for HRM, uncovering how people management practices can encourage creativity implementation in the workplace.",
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High-performance work systems and creativity implementation : the role of psychological capital and psychological safety. / Agarwal, Promila; Farndale, E.

In: Human Resource Management Journal, Vol. 27, No. 3, 07.2017, p. 440-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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