How information on sexism may increase women’s perceptions of being excluded, threaten fundamental needs, and lower career motivation

F.T. Doolaard*, G.J. Lelieveld, M.K. Noordewier, I. van Beest, E. van Dijk

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The current research investigates the effects of exposure to information about the prevalence of sexism in society on women’s perceptions, needs, expectations, and career motivation. We propose that such exposure to sexism prevalence may threaten women’s fundamental need to belong, and induces perceptions of social exclusion. Study 1 provided correlational evidence that perceiving society as sexist relates to increased perceptions of being excluded. Three experimental studies demonstrated that exposure to information about sexism in the form of fictional research results(Study 2),or actual newspaper articles (Studies 3and 4),increased women’s experiences of social exclusion. Exposure to such information also lowered women’s gender-related expectations of achieving their preferred position in society, and reduced career motivation. Together, the article provides insight in the experiential and motivational reactions to sexism in society.
Keywords: sexism, exclusion, ostracism
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2022

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