How regional personality affects individuals' life satisfaction

A case of emotional contagion?

Olga Stavrova*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Recent research has shown that life satisfaction is lower in states with a high neuroticism level than in less neurotic states. The present study disentangles the effect of state- and individual-level neuroticism on life satisfaction in a multilevel regression analysis using nationally representative data from 16 German federal states. The results show that controlling for individual-level neuroticism results in a reduction of the effect of state-level neuroticism on individuals' life satisfaction, although it remains statistically and practically significant. Hence, the ecological correlation between state-level neuroticism and state-level life satisfaction reported in prior research is not a mere reflection of individual-level associations. The process of emotional contagion is proposed as the potential mechanism of the state-level neuroticism effect. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Personality
  • Emotional contagion
  • Life satisfaction
  • Neuroticism
  • Regional differences
  • STATE-LEVEL

Cite this

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title = "How regional personality affects individuals' life satisfaction: A case of emotional contagion?",
abstract = "Recent research has shown that life satisfaction is lower in states with a high neuroticism level than in less neurotic states. The present study disentangles the effect of state- and individual-level neuroticism on life satisfaction in a multilevel regression analysis using nationally representative data from 16 German federal states. The results show that controlling for individual-level neuroticism results in a reduction of the effect of state-level neuroticism on individuals' life satisfaction, although it remains statistically and practically significant. Hence, the ecological correlation between state-level neuroticism and state-level life satisfaction reported in prior research is not a mere reflection of individual-level associations. The process of emotional contagion is proposed as the potential mechanism of the state-level neuroticism effect. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
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How regional personality affects individuals' life satisfaction : A case of emotional contagion? / Stavrova, Olga.

In: Journal of Research in Personality, Vol. 58, 10.2015, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T2 - A case of emotional contagion?

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AB - Recent research has shown that life satisfaction is lower in states with a high neuroticism level than in less neurotic states. The present study disentangles the effect of state- and individual-level neuroticism on life satisfaction in a multilevel regression analysis using nationally representative data from 16 German federal states. The results show that controlling for individual-level neuroticism results in a reduction of the effect of state-level neuroticism on individuals' life satisfaction, although it remains statistically and practically significant. Hence, the ecological correlation between state-level neuroticism and state-level life satisfaction reported in prior research is not a mere reflection of individual-level associations. The process of emotional contagion is proposed as the potential mechanism of the state-level neuroticism effect. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - Personality

KW - Emotional contagion

KW - Life satisfaction

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KW - Regional differences

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