Hypothermia in Preterm Infants in the First Hours after Birth: Occurrence, Course and Risk Factors

Arenda Mank, Henriëtte A van Zanten, Michael P Meyer, Steffen Pauws, Enrico Lopriore, Arjan B Te Pas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Preterm infants frequently have hypothermia when they are admitted to the NICU, but there is no data on the occurrence of hypothermia during the first hours after admission.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of hypothermia in preterm infants in the first three hours of admission and to identify risk factors.

METHODS: Infants < 32 weeks of gestation included in a randomized trial with admission temperature as primary outcome were retrospectively analyzed for the occurrence of hypothermia (< 36.5°C) in the first three hours after admission. Risk factors were identified using linear regression analysis and logistic regression.

RESULTS: In total 80 infants were included with a median (IQR) gestational age at birth of 29 (27-30) weeks. In 93% of the infants hypothermia occurred in the first three hours after admission. The median (IQR) duration of hypothermia was 101 (34-162) minutes, of which 24 (7-52) minutes the hypothermia was mild, 45 (4-111) minutes moderate, severe hypothermia hardly occurred. Gestational age and the occurrence of hypothermia at birth were independent risk factors for the occurrence of moderate and severe hypothermia and significantly correlated with duration of hypothermia.

CONCLUSIONS: Hypothermia occurred often and for a long period in preterm infants in the first three hours of life, low gestational age and admission temperature were independent risk factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e0164817
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Hypothermia
Premature Infants
Gestational Age
Linear regression
Regression analysis

Keywords

  • Female
  • Fever
  • Humans
  • Hypothermia
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Premature
  • Intensive Care, Neonatal
  • Male
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Time Factors
  • Journal Article

Cite this

Mank, Arenda ; van Zanten, Henriëtte A ; Meyer, Michael P ; Pauws, Steffen ; Lopriore, Enrico ; Te Pas, Arjan B. / Hypothermia in Preterm Infants in the First Hours after Birth : Occurrence, Course and Risk Factors. In: PLoS ONE. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 11. pp. e0164817.
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Hypothermia in Preterm Infants in the First Hours after Birth : Occurrence, Course and Risk Factors. / Mank, Arenda; van Zanten, Henriëtte A; Meyer, Michael P; Pauws, Steffen; Lopriore, Enrico; Te Pas, Arjan B.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 11, 2016, p. e0164817.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hypothermia in Preterm Infants in the First Hours after Birth

T2 - Occurrence, Course and Risk Factors

AU - Mank, Arenda

AU - van Zanten, Henriëtte A

AU - Meyer, Michael P

AU - Pauws, Steffen

AU - Lopriore, Enrico

AU - Te Pas, Arjan B

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - BACKGROUND: Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Preterm infants frequently have hypothermia when they are admitted to the NICU, but there is no data on the occurrence of hypothermia during the first hours after admission.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of hypothermia in preterm infants in the first three hours of admission and to identify risk factors.METHODS: Infants < 32 weeks of gestation included in a randomized trial with admission temperature as primary outcome were retrospectively analyzed for the occurrence of hypothermia (< 36.5°C) in the first three hours after admission. Risk factors were identified using linear regression analysis and logistic regression.RESULTS: In total 80 infants were included with a median (IQR) gestational age at birth of 29 (27-30) weeks. In 93% of the infants hypothermia occurred in the first three hours after admission. The median (IQR) duration of hypothermia was 101 (34-162) minutes, of which 24 (7-52) minutes the hypothermia was mild, 45 (4-111) minutes moderate, severe hypothermia hardly occurred. Gestational age and the occurrence of hypothermia at birth were independent risk factors for the occurrence of moderate and severe hypothermia and significantly correlated with duration of hypothermia.CONCLUSIONS: Hypothermia occurred often and for a long period in preterm infants in the first three hours of life, low gestational age and admission temperature were independent risk factors.

AB - BACKGROUND: Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Preterm infants frequently have hypothermia when they are admitted to the NICU, but there is no data on the occurrence of hypothermia during the first hours after admission.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of hypothermia in preterm infants in the first three hours of admission and to identify risk factors.METHODS: Infants < 32 weeks of gestation included in a randomized trial with admission temperature as primary outcome were retrospectively analyzed for the occurrence of hypothermia (< 36.5°C) in the first three hours after admission. Risk factors were identified using linear regression analysis and logistic regression.RESULTS: In total 80 infants were included with a median (IQR) gestational age at birth of 29 (27-30) weeks. In 93% of the infants hypothermia occurred in the first three hours after admission. The median (IQR) duration of hypothermia was 101 (34-162) minutes, of which 24 (7-52) minutes the hypothermia was mild, 45 (4-111) minutes moderate, severe hypothermia hardly occurred. Gestational age and the occurrence of hypothermia at birth were independent risk factors for the occurrence of moderate and severe hypothermia and significantly correlated with duration of hypothermia.CONCLUSIONS: Hypothermia occurred often and for a long period in preterm infants in the first three hours of life, low gestational age and admission temperature were independent risk factors.

KW - Female

KW - Fever

KW - Humans

KW - Hypothermia

KW - Infant, Newborn

KW - Infant, Premature

KW - Intensive Care, Neonatal

KW - Male

KW - Retrospective Studies

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Time Factors

KW - Journal Article

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DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0164817

M3 - Article

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VL - 11

SP - e0164817

JO - PLoS ONE

JF - PLoS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 11

ER -