If it doesn’t help, it doesn’t hurt?

Information elaboration harms the performance of gender-diverse teams when attributions of competence are inaccurate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Information elaboration—the act of exchanging, discussing, and integrating information and perspectives through verbal communication—tends to be considered as the silver bullet that drives the performance of diverse teams. We challenge this notion by proposing that the effect of information elaboration on team performance depends on the accuracy of within-group competence attributions, i.e. the extent to which attributions of task competence among team members correspond with members’ actual task competence. We argue that information elaboration may actually harm performance when within-group competence attributions are inaccurate, given that in such teams decisions are likely to be based on suggestions from members who have much influence but little competence. We conducted an experiment with 97 gender-heterogeneous teams working on gender-typical problems and coded their interactions. Our findings support our hypotheses that members who are perceived as more competent are more influential in the information elaboration process, and that information elaboration harms performance when competence attributions are not accurate. In contrast to our expectations, pro-diversity beliefs did not mitigate this negative effect of inaccurate competence attributions. We argue that this speaks to the robustness of our findings regarding the detrimental effects of information elaboration when competence attributions are inaccurate.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0201180
Number of pages23
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Mental Competency
Experiments

Keywords

  • BELIEFS
  • DECISION-MAKING GROUPS
  • EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
  • GROUP IDENTIFICATION
  • INTERRATER AGREEMENT
  • MODEL
  • MODERATING ROLE
  • PERSPECTIVE
  • TACIT COORDINATION
  • WORK GROUP DIVERSITY

Cite this

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title = "If it doesn’t help, it doesn’t hurt?: Information elaboration harms the performance of gender-diverse teams when attributions of competence are inaccurate",
abstract = "Information elaboration—the act of exchanging, discussing, and integrating information and perspectives through verbal communication—tends to be considered as the silver bullet that drives the performance of diverse teams. We challenge this notion by proposing that the effect of information elaboration on team performance depends on the accuracy of within-group competence attributions, i.e. the extent to which attributions of task competence among team members correspond with members’ actual task competence. We argue that information elaboration may actually harm performance when within-group competence attributions are inaccurate, given that in such teams decisions are likely to be based on suggestions from members who have much influence but little competence. We conducted an experiment with 97 gender-heterogeneous teams working on gender-typical problems and coded their interactions. Our findings support our hypotheses that members who are perceived as more competent are more influential in the information elaboration process, and that information elaboration harms performance when competence attributions are not accurate. In contrast to our expectations, pro-diversity beliefs did not mitigate this negative effect of inaccurate competence attributions. We argue that this speaks to the robustness of our findings regarding the detrimental effects of information elaboration when competence attributions are inaccurate.",
keywords = "BELIEFS, DECISION-MAKING GROUPS, EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, GROUP IDENTIFICATION, INTERRATER AGREEMENT, MODEL, MODERATING ROLE, PERSPECTIVE, TACIT COORDINATION, WORK GROUP DIVERSITY",
author = "{van Dijk}, H. and B. Meyer and {van Engen}, M.L.",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0201180",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
journal = "PLoS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
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}

If it doesn’t help, it doesn’t hurt? Information elaboration harms the performance of gender-diverse teams when attributions of competence are inaccurate. / van Dijk, H.; Meyer, B.; van Engen, M.L.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 13, No. 7, e0201180, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Meyer, B.

AU - van Engen, M.L.

PY - 2018

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N2 - Information elaboration—the act of exchanging, discussing, and integrating information and perspectives through verbal communication—tends to be considered as the silver bullet that drives the performance of diverse teams. We challenge this notion by proposing that the effect of information elaboration on team performance depends on the accuracy of within-group competence attributions, i.e. the extent to which attributions of task competence among team members correspond with members’ actual task competence. We argue that information elaboration may actually harm performance when within-group competence attributions are inaccurate, given that in such teams decisions are likely to be based on suggestions from members who have much influence but little competence. We conducted an experiment with 97 gender-heterogeneous teams working on gender-typical problems and coded their interactions. Our findings support our hypotheses that members who are perceived as more competent are more influential in the information elaboration process, and that information elaboration harms performance when competence attributions are not accurate. In contrast to our expectations, pro-diversity beliefs did not mitigate this negative effect of inaccurate competence attributions. We argue that this speaks to the robustness of our findings regarding the detrimental effects of information elaboration when competence attributions are inaccurate.

AB - Information elaboration—the act of exchanging, discussing, and integrating information and perspectives through verbal communication—tends to be considered as the silver bullet that drives the performance of diverse teams. We challenge this notion by proposing that the effect of information elaboration on team performance depends on the accuracy of within-group competence attributions, i.e. the extent to which attributions of task competence among team members correspond with members’ actual task competence. We argue that information elaboration may actually harm performance when within-group competence attributions are inaccurate, given that in such teams decisions are likely to be based on suggestions from members who have much influence but little competence. We conducted an experiment with 97 gender-heterogeneous teams working on gender-typical problems and coded their interactions. Our findings support our hypotheses that members who are perceived as more competent are more influential in the information elaboration process, and that information elaboration harms performance when competence attributions are not accurate. In contrast to our expectations, pro-diversity beliefs did not mitigate this negative effect of inaccurate competence attributions. We argue that this speaks to the robustness of our findings regarding the detrimental effects of information elaboration when competence attributions are inaccurate.

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KW - MODERATING ROLE

KW - PERSPECTIVE

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KW - WORK GROUP DIVERSITY

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