Impact of maternal childhood trauma on child behavioral problems

The role of child frontal alpha asymmetry

Maria C. J. Ven, Marion I. Heuvel*, Amanpreet Bhogal, Toni Lewis, Moriah E. Thomason

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Childhood trauma is associated with many long‐term negative outcomes, and is not limited to the individual experiencing the trauma, but extends to subsequent generations. However, mechanisms underlying the association between maternal childhood trauma and child psychopathology are not well understood. Here, we targeted frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA) as a potential underlying factor of the relationship between maternal childhood trauma and child behavioral problems. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from (N = 45) children (Mean age = 57.9 months, SD = 3.13) during an eyes‐closed paradigm in order to evaluate FAA. Mothers reported on their childhood trauma experiences using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and on their child's behavior using the child behavior checklist (CBCL). We found that maternal childhood trauma significantly predicted child total, internalizing, and externalizing behavior at age 5 years. We also observed a role for FAA such that it acted as a moderator, but not mediator, for behavioral problems. We found that children with relative more right/less left frontal activity were more at risk to develop behavioral problems when their mother had been exposed to trauma in her childhood. These results indicate that child frontal asymmetry may serve as a susceptibility marker for child behavioral problems.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

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Mothers
Wounds and Injuries
Child Behavior
Checklist
Electroencephalography

Keywords

  • ANXIETY DISORDERS
  • BRAIN ELECTRICAL-ACTIVITY
  • DIFFERENTIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY
  • EEG
  • EEG ASYMMETRY
  • INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • PARENTING STYLES
  • PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • STUDIES DEPRESSION SCALE
  • asymmetry
  • externalizing
  • internalizing
  • trauma

Cite this

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title = "Impact of maternal childhood trauma on child behavioral problems: The role of child frontal alpha asymmetry",
abstract = "Childhood trauma is associated with many long‐term negative outcomes, and is not limited to the individual experiencing the trauma, but extends to subsequent generations. However, mechanisms underlying the association between maternal childhood trauma and child psychopathology are not well understood. Here, we targeted frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA) as a potential underlying factor of the relationship between maternal childhood trauma and child behavioral problems. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from (N = 45) children (Mean age = 57.9 months, SD = 3.13) during an eyes‐closed paradigm in order to evaluate FAA. Mothers reported on their childhood trauma experiences using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and on their child's behavior using the child behavior checklist (CBCL). We found that maternal childhood trauma significantly predicted child total, internalizing, and externalizing behavior at age 5 years. We also observed a role for FAA such that it acted as a moderator, but not mediator, for behavioral problems. We found that children with relative more right/less left frontal activity were more at risk to develop behavioral problems when their mother had been exposed to trauma in her childhood. These results indicate that child frontal asymmetry may serve as a susceptibility marker for child behavioral problems.",
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author = "Ven, {Maria C. J.} and Heuvel, {Marion I.} and Amanpreet Bhogal and Toni Lewis and Thomason, {Moriah E.}",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
journal = "Developmental Psychobiology",
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Impact of maternal childhood trauma on child behavioral problems : The role of child frontal alpha asymmetry. / Ven, Maria C. J.; Heuvel, Marion I.; Bhogal, Amanpreet; Lewis, Toni; Thomason, Moriah E.

In: Developmental Psychobiology, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of maternal childhood trauma on child behavioral problems

T2 - The role of child frontal alpha asymmetry

AU - Ven, Maria C. J.

AU - Heuvel, Marion I.

AU - Bhogal, Amanpreet

AU - Lewis, Toni

AU - Thomason, Moriah E.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Childhood trauma is associated with many long‐term negative outcomes, and is not limited to the individual experiencing the trauma, but extends to subsequent generations. However, mechanisms underlying the association between maternal childhood trauma and child psychopathology are not well understood. Here, we targeted frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA) as a potential underlying factor of the relationship between maternal childhood trauma and child behavioral problems. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from (N = 45) children (Mean age = 57.9 months, SD = 3.13) during an eyes‐closed paradigm in order to evaluate FAA. Mothers reported on their childhood trauma experiences using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and on their child's behavior using the child behavior checklist (CBCL). We found that maternal childhood trauma significantly predicted child total, internalizing, and externalizing behavior at age 5 years. We also observed a role for FAA such that it acted as a moderator, but not mediator, for behavioral problems. We found that children with relative more right/less left frontal activity were more at risk to develop behavioral problems when their mother had been exposed to trauma in her childhood. These results indicate that child frontal asymmetry may serve as a susceptibility marker for child behavioral problems.

AB - Childhood trauma is associated with many long‐term negative outcomes, and is not limited to the individual experiencing the trauma, but extends to subsequent generations. However, mechanisms underlying the association between maternal childhood trauma and child psychopathology are not well understood. Here, we targeted frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA) as a potential underlying factor of the relationship between maternal childhood trauma and child behavioral problems. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from (N = 45) children (Mean age = 57.9 months, SD = 3.13) during an eyes‐closed paradigm in order to evaluate FAA. Mothers reported on their childhood trauma experiences using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and on their child's behavior using the child behavior checklist (CBCL). We found that maternal childhood trauma significantly predicted child total, internalizing, and externalizing behavior at age 5 years. We also observed a role for FAA such that it acted as a moderator, but not mediator, for behavioral problems. We found that children with relative more right/less left frontal activity were more at risk to develop behavioral problems when their mother had been exposed to trauma in her childhood. These results indicate that child frontal asymmetry may serve as a susceptibility marker for child behavioral problems.

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