Improving communication on hope in palliative care. A qualitative study of palliative care professionals' metaphors of hope: grip, source, tune, and vision.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

CONTEXT:
Hope is important in palliative care. However, palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope are not well understood. Metaphors of hope are a way of better understanding these perspectives.

OBJECTIVES:
To describe palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope by examining the hope metaphors they spontaneously used to describe their own hope and their perspectives on the hope of patients and their families.

METHODS:
Semistructured interviews with palliative care professionals were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a narrative approach. Results were discussed until the researchers reached consensus and reinforced by other health-care professionals and by observing several palliative care settings.

RESULTS:
The 64 participants (mean (SD) age, 48.42 (9.27) years and 72% female) were physicians (41%), nurses (34%), chaplains (20%), or other professionals (5%), working in Canada (19%) or The Netherlands (81%). Participants described the hope of patients, their families, or themselves as a 1) grip, which implied safety; 2) source, which implied strength; 3) tune, which implied harmony; and 4) vision, which implied a positive perspective. Compared with Dutch participants, Canadian participants generally put more emphasis on spirituality and letting go of their own hope as a grip (safety). Compared with other included professionals, physicians used hope as a grip (safety) most often, whereas chaplains used hope as a tune (harmony) most often.

CONCLUSION:
Our findings help to increase the understanding of hope and contribute to improving communication skills in palliative care professionals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)831-838
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume48
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Metaphor
Palliative Care
Communication
Clergy
Physicians
Netherlands
Consensus
Nurses

Cite this

@article{b45ab2a116ef4e14af13c8ec430864cd,
title = "Improving communication on hope in palliative care.: A qualitative study of palliative care professionals' metaphors of hope: grip, source, tune, and vision.",
abstract = "CONTEXT:Hope is important in palliative care. However, palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope are not well understood. Metaphors of hope are a way of better understanding these perspectives.OBJECTIVES:To describe palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope by examining the hope metaphors they spontaneously used to describe their own hope and their perspectives on the hope of patients and their families.METHODS:Semistructured interviews with palliative care professionals were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a narrative approach. Results were discussed until the researchers reached consensus and reinforced by other health-care professionals and by observing several palliative care settings.RESULTS:The 64 participants (mean (SD) age, 48.42 (9.27) years and 72{\%} female) were physicians (41{\%}), nurses (34{\%}), chaplains (20{\%}), or other professionals (5{\%}), working in Canada (19{\%}) or The Netherlands (81{\%}). Participants described the hope of patients, their families, or themselves as a 1) grip, which implied safety; 2) source, which implied strength; 3) tune, which implied harmony; and 4) vision, which implied a positive perspective. Compared with Dutch participants, Canadian participants generally put more emphasis on spirituality and letting go of their own hope as a grip (safety). Compared with other included professionals, physicians used hope as a grip (safety) most often, whereas chaplains used hope as a tune (harmony) most often.CONCLUSION:Our findings help to increase the understanding of hope and contribute to improving communication skills in palliative care professionals.",
author = "Renske Kruizinga",
year = "2014",
month = "4",
day = "18",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "831--838",
journal = "Journal of Pain and Symptom Management",
issn = "0885-3924",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving communication on hope in palliative care.

T2 - A qualitative study of palliative care professionals' metaphors of hope: grip, source, tune, and vision.

AU - Kruizinga, Renske

PY - 2014/4/18

Y1 - 2014/4/18

N2 - CONTEXT:Hope is important in palliative care. However, palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope are not well understood. Metaphors of hope are a way of better understanding these perspectives.OBJECTIVES:To describe palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope by examining the hope metaphors they spontaneously used to describe their own hope and their perspectives on the hope of patients and their families.METHODS:Semistructured interviews with palliative care professionals were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a narrative approach. Results were discussed until the researchers reached consensus and reinforced by other health-care professionals and by observing several palliative care settings.RESULTS:The 64 participants (mean (SD) age, 48.42 (9.27) years and 72% female) were physicians (41%), nurses (34%), chaplains (20%), or other professionals (5%), working in Canada (19%) or The Netherlands (81%). Participants described the hope of patients, their families, or themselves as a 1) grip, which implied safety; 2) source, which implied strength; 3) tune, which implied harmony; and 4) vision, which implied a positive perspective. Compared with Dutch participants, Canadian participants generally put more emphasis on spirituality and letting go of their own hope as a grip (safety). Compared with other included professionals, physicians used hope as a grip (safety) most often, whereas chaplains used hope as a tune (harmony) most often.CONCLUSION:Our findings help to increase the understanding of hope and contribute to improving communication skills in palliative care professionals.

AB - CONTEXT:Hope is important in palliative care. However, palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope are not well understood. Metaphors of hope are a way of better understanding these perspectives.OBJECTIVES:To describe palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope by examining the hope metaphors they spontaneously used to describe their own hope and their perspectives on the hope of patients and their families.METHODS:Semistructured interviews with palliative care professionals were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a narrative approach. Results were discussed until the researchers reached consensus and reinforced by other health-care professionals and by observing several palliative care settings.RESULTS:The 64 participants (mean (SD) age, 48.42 (9.27) years and 72% female) were physicians (41%), nurses (34%), chaplains (20%), or other professionals (5%), working in Canada (19%) or The Netherlands (81%). Participants described the hope of patients, their families, or themselves as a 1) grip, which implied safety; 2) source, which implied strength; 3) tune, which implied harmony; and 4) vision, which implied a positive perspective. Compared with Dutch participants, Canadian participants generally put more emphasis on spirituality and letting go of their own hope as a grip (safety). Compared with other included professionals, physicians used hope as a grip (safety) most often, whereas chaplains used hope as a tune (harmony) most often.CONCLUSION:Our findings help to increase the understanding of hope and contribute to improving communication skills in palliative care professionals.

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - 831

EP - 838

JO - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

JF - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

SN - 0885-3924

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