In plain sight but still invisible: A structured case analysis of people with mild intellectual disability or borderline intellectual functioning

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Abstract

Background
There has been substantial increase in the number of people with mild intellectual disability (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning referred to long-term care. Insight into the specific characteristics and needs of these people is essential to provide appropriate support and gain insight into the increase in referrals.
Method
This retrospective descriptive study was based on a structured case analysis of a sample of 250 participants.
Results
Mental health problems and exposure to social and familial disadvantages were common. Care provided before referral tended to be suboptimal. Individuals with borderline intellectual functioning had more personal and contextual problems than people with MID.
Conclusion
People with MID or borderline intellectual functioning are confronted with a wide range of complex problems; even after years of professional support they may still need intensive support. Differences in the characteristics and contexts between individuals with MID or borderline intellectual functioning require further exploration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-44
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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disability
Long-Term Care
Mental Health
mental health
Intellectual Disability
Invisible

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title = "In plain sight but still invisible: A structured case analysis of people with mild intellectual disability or borderline intellectual functioning",
abstract = "Background There has been substantial increase in the number of people with mild intellectual disability (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning referred to long-term care. Insight into the specific characteristics and needs of these people is essential to provide appropriate support and gain insight into the increase in referrals.Method This retrospective descriptive study was based on a structured case analysis of a sample of 250 participants.Results Mental health problems and exposure to social and familial disadvantages were common. Care provided before referral tended to be suboptimal. Individuals with borderline intellectual functioning had more personal and contextual problems than people with MID.Conclusion People with MID or borderline intellectual functioning are confronted with a wide range of complex problems; even after years of professional support they may still need intensive support. Differences in the characteristics and contexts between individuals with MID or borderline intellectual functioning require further exploration.",
author = "P.J.G. Nouwens and R. Lucas and P.J.C.M. Embregts and {van Nieuwenhuizen}, Ch.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.3109/13668250.2016.1178220",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "36--44",
journal = "Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability",
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number = "1",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - In plain sight but still invisible

T2 - A structured case analysis of people with mild intellectual disability or borderline intellectual functioning

AU - Nouwens, P.J.G.

AU - Lucas, R.

AU - Embregts, P.J.C.M.

AU - van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background There has been substantial increase in the number of people with mild intellectual disability (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning referred to long-term care. Insight into the specific characteristics and needs of these people is essential to provide appropriate support and gain insight into the increase in referrals.Method This retrospective descriptive study was based on a structured case analysis of a sample of 250 participants.Results Mental health problems and exposure to social and familial disadvantages were common. Care provided before referral tended to be suboptimal. Individuals with borderline intellectual functioning had more personal and contextual problems than people with MID.Conclusion People with MID or borderline intellectual functioning are confronted with a wide range of complex problems; even after years of professional support they may still need intensive support. Differences in the characteristics and contexts between individuals with MID or borderline intellectual functioning require further exploration.

AB - Background There has been substantial increase in the number of people with mild intellectual disability (MID) or borderline intellectual functioning referred to long-term care. Insight into the specific characteristics and needs of these people is essential to provide appropriate support and gain insight into the increase in referrals.Method This retrospective descriptive study was based on a structured case analysis of a sample of 250 participants.Results Mental health problems and exposure to social and familial disadvantages were common. Care provided before referral tended to be suboptimal. Individuals with borderline intellectual functioning had more personal and contextual problems than people with MID.Conclusion People with MID or borderline intellectual functioning are confronted with a wide range of complex problems; even after years of professional support they may still need intensive support. Differences in the characteristics and contexts between individuals with MID or borderline intellectual functioning require further exploration.

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DO - 10.3109/13668250.2016.1178220

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 36

EP - 44

JO - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

JF - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

SN - 1366-8250

IS - 1

ER -