Income and health care utilization among the 50+ in Europe and the US

M.C. Majo, A.H.O. van Soest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This study addresses the question how income affects health care utilization by the population aged 50 and over in the United States and a number of European countries with varying health care systems. The probabilities that individuals receive several medical services (visits to general practitioner, specialist, dentist, inpatient, or outpatient services) are analyzed separately using probit models. In addition to controls for income and demographic characteristics, controls for health status (both subjective and objective measures of health) are used. We analyze how the relationship between income and health care utilization varies across countries and relate these cross country differences to characteristics of the health care system, i. e., per capita total and public expenditure on health care, gate-keeping for specialist
are, and copayments.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-22
JournalApplied Econometrics
Volume28
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Income
Health care utilization
Health care system
Copayments
Public expenditure
Healthcare
Inpatients
Country differences
Dentists
Gatekeeping
Health status
Outpatient
Probit model
Health
Medical services
European countries
Demographic characteristics
General practitioners

Cite this

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Income and health care utilization among the 50+ in Europe and the US. / Majo, M.C.; van Soest, A.H.O.

In: Applied Econometrics, Vol. 28, No. 4, 2012, p. 3-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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