Inferior survival for young patients with contralateral compared to unilateral breast cancer: A nationwide population-based study in the Netherlands

A. Font-Gonzalez, L. Liu, A.C. Voogd, M. Schmidt, J.A. Roukema, J.W. Coebergh, E. de Vries, I. Soerjomataram

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

To compare overall survival between women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Women with UBC (N = 182,562; 95 %) and CBC (N = 8,912; 5 %) recorded in the Netherlands Cancer Registry between 1989 and 2008 were included and followed until 2010. We incorporated CBC as a time-dependent covariate to compute the overall mortality rate ratio between women with CBC and UBC. Prognostic factors for overall death were examined according to age at first breast cancer. Women with CBC exhibited a 30 % increase in overall mortality (Hazard Ratio (HR), 95 % Confidence Interval: 1.3, 1.3–1.4) compared with UBC, decreasing with rising age at diagnosis of first breast cancer (<50 years: 2.3, 2.2–2.5 vs. ≥70 years: 1.1, 1.0–1.1). Women older than 50 years at CBC diagnosis and diagnosed 2–5 years after their first breast cancer exhibited a 20 % higher death risk (1.2, 1.0–1.3) compared to those diagnosed within the first 2 years. In women younger than 50 years, the HR was significantly lower if the CBC was diagnosed >5 years after the first breast cancer (0.7, 0.5–0.9). The prognosis for women with CBC significantly improved over time (2004–2008: 0.6, 0.5-0.7 vs. 1989–1993). Women with CBC had a lower survival compared to women with UBC, especially those younger than 50 years at first breast cancer diagnosis. A tailored follow-up strategy beyond current recommendations is needed for these patients who, because of their age and absence of known familial risk, are currently not invited for population-based screening. Keywords: Breast neoplasms, Mortality, Prognosis, Retrospective cohort studies, Second primary
Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)811-819
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume139
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

Cite this

Font-Gonzalez, A. ; Liu, L. ; Voogd, A.C. ; Schmidt, M. ; Roukema, J.A. ; Coebergh, J.W. ; de Vries, E. ; Soerjomataram, I. / Inferior survival for young patients with contralateral compared to unilateral breast cancer : A nationwide population-based study in the Netherlands. In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. 2013 ; Vol. 139, No. 3. pp. 811-819.
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title = "Inferior survival for young patients with contralateral compared to unilateral breast cancer: A nationwide population-based study in the Netherlands",
abstract = "To compare overall survival between women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Women with UBC (N = 182,562; 95 {\%}) and CBC (N = 8,912; 5 {\%}) recorded in the Netherlands Cancer Registry between 1989 and 2008 were included and followed until 2010. We incorporated CBC as a time-dependent covariate to compute the overall mortality rate ratio between women with CBC and UBC. Prognostic factors for overall death were examined according to age at first breast cancer. Women with CBC exhibited a 30 {\%} increase in overall mortality (Hazard Ratio (HR), 95 {\%} Confidence Interval: 1.3, 1.3–1.4) compared with UBC, decreasing with rising age at diagnosis of first breast cancer (<50 years: 2.3, 2.2–2.5 vs. ≥70 years: 1.1, 1.0–1.1). Women older than 50 years at CBC diagnosis and diagnosed 2–5 years after their first breast cancer exhibited a 20 {\%} higher death risk (1.2, 1.0–1.3) compared to those diagnosed within the first 2 years. In women younger than 50 years, the HR was significantly lower if the CBC was diagnosed >5 years after the first breast cancer (0.7, 0.5–0.9). The prognosis for women with CBC significantly improved over time (2004–2008: 0.6, 0.5-0.7 vs. 1989–1993). Women with CBC had a lower survival compared to women with UBC, especially those younger than 50 years at first breast cancer diagnosis. A tailored follow-up strategy beyond current recommendations is needed for these patients who, because of their age and absence of known familial risk, are currently not invited for population-based screening. Keywords: Breast neoplasms, Mortality, Prognosis, Retrospective cohort studies, Second primary",
author = "A. Font-Gonzalez and L. Liu and A.C. Voogd and M. Schmidt and J.A. Roukema and J.W. Coebergh and {de Vries}, E. and I. Soerjomataram",
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Inferior survival for young patients with contralateral compared to unilateral breast cancer : A nationwide population-based study in the Netherlands. / Font-Gonzalez, A.; Liu, L.; Voogd, A.C.; Schmidt, M.; Roukema, J.A.; Coebergh, J.W.; de Vries, E.; Soerjomataram, I.

In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Vol. 139, No. 3, 06.2013, p. 811-819.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inferior survival for young patients with contralateral compared to unilateral breast cancer

T2 - A nationwide population-based study in the Netherlands

AU - Font-Gonzalez, A.

AU - Liu, L.

AU - Voogd, A.C.

AU - Schmidt, M.

AU - Roukema, J.A.

AU - Coebergh, J.W.

AU - de Vries, E.

AU - Soerjomataram, I.

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N2 - To compare overall survival between women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Women with UBC (N = 182,562; 95 %) and CBC (N = 8,912; 5 %) recorded in the Netherlands Cancer Registry between 1989 and 2008 were included and followed until 2010. We incorporated CBC as a time-dependent covariate to compute the overall mortality rate ratio between women with CBC and UBC. Prognostic factors for overall death were examined according to age at first breast cancer. Women with CBC exhibited a 30 % increase in overall mortality (Hazard Ratio (HR), 95 % Confidence Interval: 1.3, 1.3–1.4) compared with UBC, decreasing with rising age at diagnosis of first breast cancer (<50 years: 2.3, 2.2–2.5 vs. ≥70 years: 1.1, 1.0–1.1). Women older than 50 years at CBC diagnosis and diagnosed 2–5 years after their first breast cancer exhibited a 20 % higher death risk (1.2, 1.0–1.3) compared to those diagnosed within the first 2 years. In women younger than 50 years, the HR was significantly lower if the CBC was diagnosed >5 years after the first breast cancer (0.7, 0.5–0.9). The prognosis for women with CBC significantly improved over time (2004–2008: 0.6, 0.5-0.7 vs. 1989–1993). Women with CBC had a lower survival compared to women with UBC, especially those younger than 50 years at first breast cancer diagnosis. A tailored follow-up strategy beyond current recommendations is needed for these patients who, because of their age and absence of known familial risk, are currently not invited for population-based screening. Keywords: Breast neoplasms, Mortality, Prognosis, Retrospective cohort studies, Second primary

AB - To compare overall survival between women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Women with UBC (N = 182,562; 95 %) and CBC (N = 8,912; 5 %) recorded in the Netherlands Cancer Registry between 1989 and 2008 were included and followed until 2010. We incorporated CBC as a time-dependent covariate to compute the overall mortality rate ratio between women with CBC and UBC. Prognostic factors for overall death were examined according to age at first breast cancer. Women with CBC exhibited a 30 % increase in overall mortality (Hazard Ratio (HR), 95 % Confidence Interval: 1.3, 1.3–1.4) compared with UBC, decreasing with rising age at diagnosis of first breast cancer (<50 years: 2.3, 2.2–2.5 vs. ≥70 years: 1.1, 1.0–1.1). Women older than 50 years at CBC diagnosis and diagnosed 2–5 years after their first breast cancer exhibited a 20 % higher death risk (1.2, 1.0–1.3) compared to those diagnosed within the first 2 years. In women younger than 50 years, the HR was significantly lower if the CBC was diagnosed >5 years after the first breast cancer (0.7, 0.5–0.9). The prognosis for women with CBC significantly improved over time (2004–2008: 0.6, 0.5-0.7 vs. 1989–1993). Women with CBC had a lower survival compared to women with UBC, especially those younger than 50 years at first breast cancer diagnosis. A tailored follow-up strategy beyond current recommendations is needed for these patients who, because of their age and absence of known familial risk, are currently not invited for population-based screening. Keywords: Breast neoplasms, Mortality, Prognosis, Retrospective cohort studies, Second primary

U2 - 10.1007/s10549-013-2588-9

DO - 10.1007/s10549-013-2588-9

M3 - Article

VL - 139

SP - 811

EP - 819

JO - Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

JF - Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

SN - 0167-6806

IS - 3

ER -