Integrating who “we” are with what “we” (will not) stand for: a further extension of the social identity model of collective action

M. van Zomeren, M. Kutlaca, F. Turner-Zwinkels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Collective action refers to any action that individuals undertake as group members to pursue group goals such as social change. In this chapter, we further extend the Social Identity Model of Collective Action (SIMCA) by including not just (politicised) identity but also moral motivations into its core, effectively integrating who we are with what we (will not) stand for. Conceptually, we utilise self-categorisation theory's notion of normative fit to elaborate this special relationship between the moral and identity motivations for collective action. Empirically, we review two research projects (the experimental and survey-based Value-Identity Fit Project and the longitudinal Politicisation Project) that both suggest that the SIMCA needs to be extended to include, both conceptually and empirically, a broader range of (violated) moral beliefs and a focus on identity content. We discuss key implications of expanding the core of the SIMCA for the social psychology of collective action and social change, and suggest new directions for future theorising and research in this field.
KEYWORDS: Collective action, social protest, social identity, moral beliefs, politicisation, values, right violation
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-160
JournalEuropean Review of Social Psychology
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • ATTITUDES
  • COMPETENCE
  • Collective action
  • EFFICACY
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • MOVEMENT PARTICIPATION
  • PERSPECTIVES
  • PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS
  • SELF-CATEGORIZATION
  • VALUE PROTECTION MODEL
  • VALUES
  • moral beliefs
  • politicisation
  • right violation
  • social identity
  • social protest
  • values

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