International careers and career success of Indian women in science & technology

The importance of career capital and organizational capital

R. Valk, E.G. van der Velde, M.L. van Engen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This article presents a study on international careers and career success of Indian women in Science & Technology (S&T). We conducted interviews with 30 (upper) middle class Indian women in New Delhi and Bangalore (India) who pursued careers abroad as self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Important elements of career capital competencies in international career pursuits and career success of Indian women SIEs in S&T were: (a) families who value higher education and careers of their female children, which motivated women to pursue international careers to elevate family class status (knowing-why); (b) the motivation to gain knowledge and skills in science and technology (knowing-how) and (c) the encouragement and support from family for women’s international career pursuits, and international networks (knowing-whom). Furthermore, findings show that patriarchy entrenched in Indian society and culture resulted in a lack of organizational capital, which impede career success of women in S&T. We advise organizations in India to implement HR policies and practices embracing the development of career capital to empower Indian women in S&T to be successful in their international careers. Keywords: Indian women, self-initiated expatriates, career capital, organizational capital, career success
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-205
JournalSouth Asian Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Career capital
Career success
Organizational capital
Self-initiated expatriates
Middle class
International networks
Key words
Competency
Patriarchy

Cite this

@article{cd143a705c0448b6a44e529d461e4515,
title = "International careers and career success of Indian women in science & technology: The importance of career capital and organizational capital",
abstract = "This article presents a study on international careers and career success of Indian women in Science & Technology (S&T). We conducted interviews with 30 (upper) middle class Indian women in New Delhi and Bangalore (India) who pursued careers abroad as self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Important elements of career capital competencies in international career pursuits and career success of Indian women SIEs in S&T were: (a) families who value higher education and careers of their female children, which motivated women to pursue international careers to elevate family class status (knowing-why); (b) the motivation to gain knowledge and skills in science and technology (knowing-how) and (c) the encouragement and support from family for women’s international career pursuits, and international networks (knowing-whom). Furthermore, findings show that patriarchy entrenched in Indian society and culture resulted in a lack of organizational capital, which impede career success of women in S&T. We advise organizations in India to implement HR policies and practices embracing the development of career capital to empower Indian women in S&T to be successful in their international careers. Keywords: Indian women, self-initiated expatriates, career capital, organizational capital, career success",
author = "R. Valk and {van der Velde}, E.G. and {van Engen}, M.L.",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1177/2322093714549107",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "175--205",
journal = "South Asian Journal of Human Resource Management",
issn = "2322-0937",
publisher = "Sage Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

International careers and career success of Indian women in science & technology : The importance of career capital and organizational capital. / Valk, R.; van der Velde, E.G.; van Engen, M.L.

In: South Asian Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 1, No. 2, 2014, p. 175-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - International careers and career success of Indian women in science & technology

T2 - The importance of career capital and organizational capital

AU - Valk, R.

AU - van der Velde, E.G.

AU - van Engen, M.L.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - This article presents a study on international careers and career success of Indian women in Science & Technology (S&T). We conducted interviews with 30 (upper) middle class Indian women in New Delhi and Bangalore (India) who pursued careers abroad as self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Important elements of career capital competencies in international career pursuits and career success of Indian women SIEs in S&T were: (a) families who value higher education and careers of their female children, which motivated women to pursue international careers to elevate family class status (knowing-why); (b) the motivation to gain knowledge and skills in science and technology (knowing-how) and (c) the encouragement and support from family for women’s international career pursuits, and international networks (knowing-whom). Furthermore, findings show that patriarchy entrenched in Indian society and culture resulted in a lack of organizational capital, which impede career success of women in S&T. We advise organizations in India to implement HR policies and practices embracing the development of career capital to empower Indian women in S&T to be successful in their international careers. Keywords: Indian women, self-initiated expatriates, career capital, organizational capital, career success

AB - This article presents a study on international careers and career success of Indian women in Science & Technology (S&T). We conducted interviews with 30 (upper) middle class Indian women in New Delhi and Bangalore (India) who pursued careers abroad as self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Important elements of career capital competencies in international career pursuits and career success of Indian women SIEs in S&T were: (a) families who value higher education and careers of their female children, which motivated women to pursue international careers to elevate family class status (knowing-why); (b) the motivation to gain knowledge and skills in science and technology (knowing-how) and (c) the encouragement and support from family for women’s international career pursuits, and international networks (knowing-whom). Furthermore, findings show that patriarchy entrenched in Indian society and culture resulted in a lack of organizational capital, which impede career success of women in S&T. We advise organizations in India to implement HR policies and practices embracing the development of career capital to empower Indian women in S&T to be successful in their international careers. Keywords: Indian women, self-initiated expatriates, career capital, organizational capital, career success

U2 - 10.1177/2322093714549107

DO - 10.1177/2322093714549107

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 175

EP - 205

JO - South Asian Journal of Human Resource Management

JF - South Asian Journal of Human Resource Management

SN - 2322-0937

IS - 2

ER -