International law and the ides of March: A response to David Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorScientificpeer-review

Abstract

My response to this year’s Montesquieu lecture focuses on Professor Kennedy’s invitation to imagine the liberal institutional order as having been a dream-like experience, from which international elites have abruptly awoken. Yet, I engage that invitation by altering the framing somewhat. Perhaps the experience that was the liberal institutional order was a kind of theatre as opposed to merely a dreamscape. The ‘deliberate’ enactment of a geopolitical and geo-eco-nomic imaginary,1 but where liberal actors forgot over time that this ruling imaginary required a convincing public performance.2 Using my frame, the ensuing decay or collapse of the imaginary then invites a different kind of cautionary tale, where the scene of awakening is a prologue. The actual plot involves a settling of economic, political and legal debts incurred by liberal elites to sustain an imaginary that now confronts declining domestic and international purchase.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-124
Number of pages4
JournalTilburg Law Review: Journal on international and comparative law
Volume23
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2018

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Cite this

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title = "International law and the ides of March: A response to David Kennedy",
abstract = "My response to this year’s Montesquieu lecture focuses on Professor Kennedy’s invitation to imagine the liberal institutional order as having been a dream-like experience, from which international elites have abruptly awoken. Yet, I engage that invitation by altering the framing somewhat. Perhaps the experience that was the liberal institutional order was a kind of theatre as opposed to merely a dreamscape. The ‘deliberate’ enactment of a geopolitical and geo-eco-nomic imaginary,1 but where liberal actors forgot over time that this ruling imaginary required a convincing public performance.2 Using my frame, the ensuing decay or collapse of the imaginary then invites a different kind of cautionary tale, where the scene of awakening is a prologue. The actual plot involves a settling of economic, political and legal debts incurred by liberal elites to sustain an imaginary that now confronts declining domestic and international purchase.",
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International law and the ides of March : A response to David Kennedy. / Rajkovic, Nikolas.

In: Tilburg Law Review: Journal on international and comparative law, Vol. 23, No. 1-2, 20.12.2018, p. 121-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorScientificpeer-review

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