Interpreting ambiguous emotional information: Convergence among interpretation bias measures and unique relations with depression severity

Cliodhna E O'Connor*, Jonas Everaert, Amanda Fitzgerald

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the convergence among interpretation bias measures and their associations with depressive symptom severity. Research into interpretation biases employs measures of interpretation bias interchangeably, however, little is known about the relationship between these measures. Participants (N = 82 unselected undergraduate students; 59 female) completed four computer-based interpretation bias tasks in a cross-sectional design study. Indirect measures, based on participants' reaction times, were not correlated with each other and had poor split-half reliability. Direct measures were more strongly correlated with depressive symptoms than indirect measures, but only the Scrambled Sentences Task explained a reliable unique portion of the variance in depressive symptoms. Interpretation bias tasks may not measure the same cognitive process and may differ in the extent to which they are a cognitive marker of depression-linked interpretation bias. These findings help to improve the measurement of and theory underlying interpretation bias and depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2021

Keywords

  • ANXIETY
  • ATTENTION
  • DISORDERS
  • EYE
  • HALF-EMPTY GLASS
  • MEMORY
  • MODULATION
  • MOOD
  • NEGATIVE INTERPRETATION BIAS
  • STARTLE
  • cognitive bias
  • depression
  • depressive symptoms
  • interpretation bias

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