Investigating the impact of a combined approach of perceived organisational support for strengths use and deficit correction on employee outcomes

C. Els, K. Mostert, M. van Woerkom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

23 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Orientation:
The positive psychology paradigm suggests a balanced focus on employee strengths and deficits. However, an overemphasis on strengths has raised questions regarding the value of a focus on strengths use, deficit improvement or a combined approach with a balanced focus on both.
Research purpose:
The primary objective was to examine whether perceived organisational support (POS) for strengths use, POS for deficit improvement or a combined approach would be the strongest predictor of work engagement, learning, job satisfaction and turnover intention.
Motivation for the study:
In the literature, there is little empirical evidence to support an approach where both employees’ strengths are used and their deficits improved.
Research design, approach and method: This study was conducted among 266 teachers from four public schools in the Western Cape. A cross-sectional survey design was used.
Main findings:
The results suggest that both strengths use and deficit improvement are important predictors of work engagement, learning, job satisfaction and turnover intention. Learning was higher and turnover intention lower for individuals experiencing a combined approach compared to those believing that their school did not support them in either using their strengths or improving their deficits. Furthermore, a combined approach was associated
with higher job satisfaction than a strengths-based approach, and a deficit-based approach was shown to be associated with higher levels of work engagement and lower turnover intentions compared to an environment where neither employees’ strengths nor deficits were addressed.
Practical or managerial implications:
The results urge organisations to invest an equal amount of resources in their employees’ strengths and deficits, as opposed to neglecting either one. Such a combined approach may be associated with increased work engagement, learning and job satisfaction and lower turnover intention.
Contribution:
This study provides empirical evidence that supports a combined approach where both employees’ strengths are used and their deficits developed.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbera882
Number of pages11
JournalSA Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Employees
Perceived organizational support
Turnover intention
Work engagement
Job satisfaction
Job turnover
Empirical evidence
Predictors
Resources
Research design
Positive psychology
Survey design
Paradigm
Public schools

Keywords

  • DELIBERATE PRACTICE
  • EMOTIONAL EXHAUSTION
  • JOB-SATISFACTION
  • MODEL
  • PERFORMANCE
  • SCHOOL CONTEXT
  • SELF-EFFICACY
  • TEACHER BURNOUT
  • TURNOVER INTENTIONS
  • WORK ENGAGEMENT

Cite this

@article{4b0ab936f12f408f90b49c131a7b954a,
title = "Investigating the impact of a combined approach of perceived organisational support for strengths use and deficit correction on employee outcomes",
abstract = "Orientation: The positive psychology paradigm suggests a balanced focus on employee strengths and deficits. However, an overemphasis on strengths has raised questions regarding the value of a focus on strengths use, deficit improvement or a combined approach with a balanced focus on both.Research purpose: The primary objective was to examine whether perceived organisational support (POS) for strengths use, POS for deficit improvement or a combined approach would be the strongest predictor of work engagement, learning, job satisfaction and turnover intention.Motivation for the study: In the literature, there is little empirical evidence to support an approach where both employees’ strengths are used and their deficits improved.Research design, approach and method: This study was conducted among 266 teachers from four public schools in the Western Cape. A cross-sectional survey design was used.Main findings: The results suggest that both strengths use and deficit improvement are important predictors of work engagement, learning, job satisfaction and turnover intention. Learning was higher and turnover intention lower for individuals experiencing a combined approach compared to those believing that their school did not support them in either using their strengths or improving their deficits. Furthermore, a combined approach was associatedwith higher job satisfaction than a strengths-based approach, and a deficit-based approach was shown to be associated with higher levels of work engagement and lower turnover intentions compared to an environment where neither employees’ strengths nor deficits were addressed. Practical or managerial implications: The results urge organisations to invest an equal amount of resources in their employees’ strengths and deficits, as opposed to neglecting either one. Such a combined approach may be associated with increased work engagement, learning and job satisfaction and lower turnover intention.Contribution: This study provides empirical evidence that supports a combined approach where both employees’ strengths are used and their deficits developed.",
keywords = "DELIBERATE PRACTICE, EMOTIONAL EXHAUSTION, JOB-SATISFACTION, MODEL, PERFORMANCE, SCHOOL CONTEXT, SELF-EFFICACY, TEACHER BURNOUT, TURNOVER INTENTIONS, WORK ENGAGEMENT",
author = "C. Els and K. Mostert and {van Woerkom}, M.",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.4102/sajhrm.v16i0.882",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
journal = "SA Journal of Human Resource Management",
issn = "2071-078X",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigating the impact of a combined approach of perceived organisational support for strengths use and deficit correction on employee outcomes

AU - Els, C.

AU - Mostert, K.

AU - van Woerkom, M.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Orientation: The positive psychology paradigm suggests a balanced focus on employee strengths and deficits. However, an overemphasis on strengths has raised questions regarding the value of a focus on strengths use, deficit improvement or a combined approach with a balanced focus on both.Research purpose: The primary objective was to examine whether perceived organisational support (POS) for strengths use, POS for deficit improvement or a combined approach would be the strongest predictor of work engagement, learning, job satisfaction and turnover intention.Motivation for the study: In the literature, there is little empirical evidence to support an approach where both employees’ strengths are used and their deficits improved.Research design, approach and method: This study was conducted among 266 teachers from four public schools in the Western Cape. A cross-sectional survey design was used.Main findings: The results suggest that both strengths use and deficit improvement are important predictors of work engagement, learning, job satisfaction and turnover intention. Learning was higher and turnover intention lower for individuals experiencing a combined approach compared to those believing that their school did not support them in either using their strengths or improving their deficits. Furthermore, a combined approach was associatedwith higher job satisfaction than a strengths-based approach, and a deficit-based approach was shown to be associated with higher levels of work engagement and lower turnover intentions compared to an environment where neither employees’ strengths nor deficits were addressed. Practical or managerial implications: The results urge organisations to invest an equal amount of resources in their employees’ strengths and deficits, as opposed to neglecting either one. Such a combined approach may be associated with increased work engagement, learning and job satisfaction and lower turnover intention.Contribution: This study provides empirical evidence that supports a combined approach where both employees’ strengths are used and their deficits developed.

AB - Orientation: The positive psychology paradigm suggests a balanced focus on employee strengths and deficits. However, an overemphasis on strengths has raised questions regarding the value of a focus on strengths use, deficit improvement or a combined approach with a balanced focus on both.Research purpose: The primary objective was to examine whether perceived organisational support (POS) for strengths use, POS for deficit improvement or a combined approach would be the strongest predictor of work engagement, learning, job satisfaction and turnover intention.Motivation for the study: In the literature, there is little empirical evidence to support an approach where both employees’ strengths are used and their deficits improved.Research design, approach and method: This study was conducted among 266 teachers from four public schools in the Western Cape. A cross-sectional survey design was used.Main findings: The results suggest that both strengths use and deficit improvement are important predictors of work engagement, learning, job satisfaction and turnover intention. Learning was higher and turnover intention lower for individuals experiencing a combined approach compared to those believing that their school did not support them in either using their strengths or improving their deficits. Furthermore, a combined approach was associatedwith higher job satisfaction than a strengths-based approach, and a deficit-based approach was shown to be associated with higher levels of work engagement and lower turnover intentions compared to an environment where neither employees’ strengths nor deficits were addressed. Practical or managerial implications: The results urge organisations to invest an equal amount of resources in their employees’ strengths and deficits, as opposed to neglecting either one. Such a combined approach may be associated with increased work engagement, learning and job satisfaction and lower turnover intention.Contribution: This study provides empirical evidence that supports a combined approach where both employees’ strengths are used and their deficits developed.

KW - DELIBERATE PRACTICE

KW - EMOTIONAL EXHAUSTION

KW - JOB-SATISFACTION

KW - MODEL

KW - PERFORMANCE

KW - SCHOOL CONTEXT

KW - SELF-EFFICACY

KW - TEACHER BURNOUT

KW - TURNOVER INTENTIONS

KW - WORK ENGAGEMENT

U2 - 10.4102/sajhrm.v16i0.882

DO - 10.4102/sajhrm.v16i0.882

M3 - Article

VL - 16

JO - SA Journal of Human Resource Management

JF - SA Journal of Human Resource Management

SN - 2071-078X

M1 - a882

ER -