Invisible, therefore isolated: Comparative effects of team virtuality with task virtuality on workplace isolation and work outcomes

Mehmet A. Orhan, John Rijsman, Gerda van Dijk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The new standards of technological and flexible arrangements have made virtual work prevalent for almost everyone in all levels of an organization. Whether in a virtual or traditional setting, current working conditions allow anyone to collaborate, work and interact with others through electronic means of
communication, thereby creating a lack of face-to-face contact. Even though the dynamics of virtuality have been widely elaborated at the team level, there are still many unknowns about the impacts of virtuality experienced at an individual level. This paper aims to shed light on the relationship between workplace social isolation, job satisfaction, perceived performance and turnover intention comparing individual responses to team virtuality and task virtuality. Our findings propose that there are statistically significant relations between individual task virtuality, workplace social isolation, satisfaction, perceived performance and turnover intention in organizations. The results also reveal that task virtuality is a better predictor than team virtuality in estimating workplace social isolation and turnover intention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-122
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Invisible, therefore isolated: Comparative effects of team virtuality with task virtuality on workplace isolation and work outcomes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this